KKK to hold rally celebrating Trump victory
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KKK to hold rally celebrating Trump victory

White supremacist group website says president-elect’s campaign ‘united my people’; parade to take place Dec. 3 in North Carolina

Illustrative: A Ku Klux Klansman, left, uses an American flag to fend off angry counter protesters after members of the KKK tried to start a 'White Lives Matter' rally at Pearson Park in Anaheim, California, on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016. (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times via AP)
Illustrative: A Ku Klux Klansman, left, uses an American flag to fend off angry counter protesters after members of the KKK tried to start a 'White Lives Matter' rally at Pearson Park in Anaheim, California, on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016. (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times via AP)

The Ku Klux Klan is to hold a victory parade in North Carolina to celebrate Donald Trump’s win over Hillary Clinton in Tuesday’s US presidential elections.

The parade is scheduled for December 3, according to the KKK website.

“Trump’s Race United My People,” the website’s homepage reads, featuring an image of the president-elect flanked in the center of the gold ring emblazoned with the words “President of the United States.”

The white supremacist group’s stated goal is to try “to help restore America to a White Christian nation.” It firmly rejects the claim that it is a hate group, saying it tries focus on the love of the white race.

Screen capture taken from the KKK website on November 11, 2016, celebrating Donald Trump's election win
Screen capture taken from the KKK website on November 11, 2016, celebrating Donald Trump’s election win

Earlier this month, a prominent KKK paper endorsed Trump, publishing on its front page a lengthy defense of the Trump campaign slogan “Make America Great Again.”

Pastor Thomas Robb, the national director of the Knights of the KKK, wrote in the quarterly paper The Crusader that, “while Trump wants to make America great again, we have to ask ourselves, ‘What made America great in the first place?’ The short answer to that is simple. America was great not because of what our forefathers did — but because of who our forefathers were.”

Nazi-themed graffiti found in the town of Wellsville, New York, on the same day that Donald Trump won the presidential election on November 9, 2016. (Twitter/JTA)
Nazi-themed graffiti found in the town of Wellsville, New York, on the same day that Donald Trump won the presidential election on November 9, 2016. (Twitter/JTA)

“America was founded as a White Christian Republic. And as a White Christian Republic it became great,” he wrote.

From its early days, the Trump campaign has attracted the support of white nationalists and the American Nazi Party, and the so-called “alt-right” political movement has formed a substantial chunk of Trump’s base.

In August, the chairman of the American Nazi party said the Trump candidacy offered a “real opportunity” to build the white nationalist movement.

Former KKK leader David Duke, an avowed racist and anti-Semite, endorsed Trump and publicly urged followers to vote from him in the presidential elections. After Trump’s shock victory, he claimed credit for helping to secure the Republican’s win.

The Trump camp, which has sought to strike a conciliatory note after the election, rejected the KKK rally. “Mr. Trump and his team continue to disavow these groups and individuals and strongly condemn their message of hate,” said his spokeswoman, according to the New York Post.

Trump previously disavowed the endorsements from Duke and the KKK.

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