Israel’s culture minister welcomes Oscars’ snub of Israel’s entry ‘Foxtrot’
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Israel’s culture minister welcomes Oscars’ snub of Israel’s entry ‘Foxtrot’

Miri Regev, famously critical of the movie, says lack of nomination ‘prevented untruthful worldwide representation of the Israeli army’

Culture Minister Miri Regev arrives at the weekly cabinet meeting at the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem, on December 31, 2017. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)
Culture Minister Miri Regev arrives at the weekly cabinet meeting at the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem, on December 31, 2017. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Culture Minister Miri Regev has welcomed the failure of Israel’s controversial candidate for the Oscars to win a nomination, having called the film “Foxtrot” an insult to the military.

“I think the decision saved us from bitter disappointment and prevented an untruthful worldwide representation of the Israeli army,” she told Army Radio on Tuesday.

The surreal and complex “Foxtrot” by director Samuel Maoz won Israel’s best film award in September, making it the country’s pick for the Academy Awards.

The tale of parental grief, trauma and loss was one of nine films named by the Academy to the shortlist, which was whittled down to five finalists ahead of the March 4 ceremony. Ninety-two films had been considered, the Academy said.

Movies from Lebanon, Chile, Russia, Hungary and Sweden made the final cut.

With its occasionally harsh view of the Israeli military, “Foxtrot” brought down the wrath of right-wing firebrand Regev, despite winning the Grand Jury prize at the Venice Film Festival.

A record 92 countries submitted films for the best foreign-language Oscar, and “Foxtrot” failed to make the final five nominee list.

Regev, who acknowledges not having seen Foxtrot, says her ire is not based on artistic criteria, but on Israel’s image abroad.

“A film which shows Israeli army soldiers in a deceptive manner as murderers and harms the good name of the Israel Defense Forces is not fit to represent Israel,” she said.

Regev is no stranger to controversy, and has repeatedly clashed with the largely left-leaning cultural elite.

They have accused her of seeking to muzzle them, including by promoting a bill to cut subsidies to cultural institutions deemed not “loyal” to the state.

She was not invited to September’s Ophir Awards — Israel’s version of the Oscars — where “Foxtrot” won the best picture prize.

An Israeli soldier does a mock dance with his rifle in “Foxtrot.” (Sony Pictures Classics)

She instead appeared live on her Facebook page to criticize the movie and members of the Film and Television Academy.

In 2016, she was booed on arrival at a cultural conference and hit back from the podium.

“As the famous Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu once said: ‘Cut the bullshit,'” she snapped.

She raised hackles earlier this week after posting a video clip of herself with supporters of the Beitar Jerusalem soccer club at a game against an Arab team, where Beitar fans reportedly were singing, “Torch their village.”

Beitar, the only team in the Israeli league that has never had an Arab Muslim player, is known for its anti-Arab chants and often violent ultra-nationalist Jewish fans.

Regev said that, from where she stood at Monday’s game against Sakhnin, it was impossible to make out anything beyond what was said by those immediately next to her, and she heard no offensives remarks.

“I didn’t hear what was sung,” she said in the Army Radio interview.

“There were thousands of people there. I only heard those who were next to me, who didn’t do anything (wrong).”

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

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