Arab media are anticipating a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas Tuesday, but the editorials keep getting shriller.

“Inklings of a ceasefire, while Hamas and Jihad insist on a comprehensive deal,” reads the headline of the London-based daily Al-Hayat. The paper reports that on Monday the two movements submitted their final draft proposal for a “comprehensive deal.” US President Barack Obama called his Egyptian counterpart, asking him to intercede with Hamas to stop firing missiles at Israel.

Meanwhile, a senior Fatah official, Azzam Al-Ahmad, harshly criticizes Egyptian-Turkish-Qatari efforts to broker a ceasefire in Cairo. Al-Ahmad tells Al-Hayat Tuesday that the three countries are merely “trying to help Israel find a way out of its current conundrum rather than helping the Palestinians in Gaza.”

“Israel continues its strikes on Gaza and the Israeli army cancels orders to invade at the last moment,” reads the headline of the Saudi-owned daily A-Sharq Al-Awsat.

Both Israel and Hamas are employing electronic means to wage psychological warfare, claims a separate article in the daily. Reportedly, Israel has managed to take control of Hamas’s Al-Aqsa TV and radio channels twice and insert official IDF statements “in an attempt to harm the morale of Gaza residents.”

Israel, the article reports, has also utilized its control over Gaza’s Internet infrastructure to contact tens of thousands of government employees in Gaza and warn them against remaining in buildings where Hamas’s Al-Qassam fighters are operating.

“We will never give up on Gaza,” promises Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah on Monday, according to Qatari TV channel Al-Jazeera. “This is our religious, moral and human duty.”

An Arab League delegation is set to arrive in Gaza today, but Atwan says that courtesy visits are the last thing Gaza needs right now

In a speech in Beirut, Nasrallah says that true courage would push Arab states to arm Gaza as soon as possible.

But not only Islamist leaders believe that.

Abdel Bari Atwan, the editor-in-chief of Al-Quds Al-Arabi, an Arab nationalist daily published in London, claims that Gaza needs Arab armies, not Arab tears.

An Arab League delegation is set to arrive in Gaza today, but Atwan says that courtesy visits are the last thing Gaza needs right now.

“The people of Gaza who are subjected to missile fire and Israeli attacks day and night should shut the door in the face of the delegation headed by the secretary general of the Arab League… and demand that they return home.

“The people in the Gaza Strip do not want ‘tourists’ at foreign minister level… coming to the Gaza Strip to falsely claim they feel their plight,” Atwan continues. “Why don’t they give Stinger anti-aircraft missiles to the resistance factions in Gaza to counterbalance the Israeli Air Force? or is it ‘forbidden’ for these weapons to be used against Israelis and protect Sunni Muslim Palestinians?”

Meanwhile, in Syria

Despite the Arab media being focused on Gaza, Syria has not been completely forgotten. Al-Jazeera reports that the Free Syrian Army has attacked the Syrian army position in Aleppo and Damascus Tuesday morning, amid heavy government shelling that killed some 100 Syrians on Monday.

Al-Hayat reports on continued clashes between Kurdish fighters affiliated with the PKK and the Syrian army.

Iran, the daily reports, is striving to support the Syrian energy sector, the daily reports, through a gas pipeline to pass through Iraq at a cost of $10 billion

Saleh Muslim, head of the Kurdish Democratic Union, said that his fighters do not want to fight with the Free Syrian Army but noted that “those who fight Kurds in the Ras Al-Ain region are receiving their orders from Turkey, and have entered the city from Turkey.”

A-Sharq Al-Awsat focuses on the political side of things, reporting that on Monday the European Union recognized the new Syrian opposition coalition.

Iran, the daily reports, is striving to support the Syrian energy sector by means of a gas pipeline to pass through Iraq at a cost of $10 billion. The opposition, for its part, is attempting to take control of economic centers in northern Syria “to cut the financial lifeline” of the Assad regime.