Some like it hot. But even those people have likely spent the last couple of months searching for air-conditioned oases.

That’s because the country is in the midst of one of the hottest summers in its 64-year history, if not the hottest.

A soldier trekking through the desert in June. (photo credit: Moshe Shai/Flash90)

A soldier trekking through the desert in June. (photo credit: Moshe Shai/Flash90)

The average temperature in July was the highest in years, and August seems to be headed for the record books as well.

However, early assessments suggest the upcoming autumn and winter will be rainy.

It looked like the average temperature in August would be the highest one registered for the last 60 years. July’s average was almost a degree and a half (Celsius) higher than normal, the Yedioth Ahronoth daily reported on Monday.

July in Jerusalem averaged 32.3 degrees Celsius, well above the 30-degree average for that city. In Beit She’an, in the sweltering Jordan Valley, July averaged 39.2 degrees, above the 37.6 average temperature.

Cooling off at the beach in Eilat. (photo credit: Nati Shohat/Flash90)

Cooling off at the beach in Eilat. (photo credit: Nati Shohat/Flash90)

According to a report by Dr. Amos Prat of the Meteorological Center, both months also featured long and significant heat waves in the middle, resulting in streaks of extra-hot days.

Not to fear, though. Early projections by American and European meteorologists suggest Israel is facing a rainy winter, with heavy rainfall in the north of the country.

The projections, cited by the Hebrew daily, said the center of the country would receive a lot of rain, but it would still be below the annual average. The north, however, could have rainfalls above the usual amounts.

The first rains were projected for November, as opposed to last year, when the downpours started in December.