Biden not sure he has ’emotional energy’ for presidential run
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Biden not sure he has ’emotional energy’ for presidential run

Veep explains hesitancy in meeting at Atlanta synagogue; first Democratic presidential debate is on October 13

US Vice President Joe Biden meets with Jewish community leaders at the David Posnack Jewish Community Center to discuss the nuclear deal reached with Iran on September 3, 2015 in Davie, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP)
US Vice President Joe Biden meets with Jewish community leaders at the David Posnack Jewish Community Center to discuss the nuclear deal reached with Iran on September 3, 2015 in Davie, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP)

ATLANTA (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden says he is unsure if he will seek the Democratic presidential nomination, saying his decision will hinge on whether he and his family have the “emotional energy to run.”

Biden offered his most extensive public remarks regarding his deliberations about entering a Democratic primary race that includes front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton and other long-shot candidates, including Sen. Bernie Sanders. Biden’s entry would shake up the campaign at a time when some Democrats would like to see more options.

Clinton had locked up much of the Democratic establishment and few expected Biden to enter the race. But the former secretary of state’s recent slide in Democratic primary polls and questions surrounding her use of a private email account and server while at the State Department have prompted the vice president to explore a campaign to succeed his boss, President Barack Obama.

Biden, who unsuccessfully sought the White House in 1988 and 2008, said he did not know if he would mount a campaign — a move that would come months after the death of his 46-year-old son, Beau Biden.

“Unless I can go to my party and the American people and say that I am able to devote my whole heart and my whole soul to this endeavor, it would not be appropriate,” Biden said Thursday, responding to a question following a foreign policy address at an Atlanta synagogue.

He said based on his previous experiences, there was “no way to put a timetable on it.” But he added, “If I can reach that conclusion and we can do it in a fashion that would still make it viable, I would not hesitate to do it.”

Capping a day that saw Biden defend Obama’s work to forge a nuclear agreement with Iran, the vice president made clear family came first.

“The most relevant factor in my decision is whether my family and I have the emotional energy to run,” Biden said, responding to a question posed by his longtime friend, Stuart Eizenstat, a former US ambassador to the European Union.

“Everybody talks about a lot of other factors, other people in the race, whether I can raise the money, whether I can put together an organization. That’s not the factor,” Biden said. “The factor is, ‘Can I do it? Can my family undertake what is an arduous commitment?’ That we would be proud to undertake in ordinary circumstances and the honest to god answer is, I just don’t know.”

Democrats have said Biden is likely to make a decision this month. The first Democratic presidential debate is on Oct. 13, giving him a strong incentive to make up his mind before the first televised encounter of the primary campaign.

If Biden joined the field, he would be closely associated with Obama, who maintains strong support among rank-and-file Democrats. But the vice president has also signaled that he would seek to champion progressive policies, meeting recently with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of liberals, and a key labor leader.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press.

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