Celebration at Warsaw synagogue nixed over security scare
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Celebration at Warsaw synagogue nixed over security scare

Planned festivities for Jewish community will not take place because of unspecified threats

The entrance to the Nozyk Synagogue in Warsaw, Poland, the only surviving synagogue in Warsaw built before World War II. It was built between 1898-1902 and restored after World War II. It is still operational and currently houses the Warsaw Jewish Community, as well as other Jewish organizations. (Flash90)
The entrance to the Nozyk Synagogue in Warsaw, Poland, the only surviving synagogue in Warsaw built before World War II. It was built between 1898-1902 and restored after World War II. It is still operational and currently houses the Warsaw Jewish Community, as well as other Jewish organizations. (Flash90)

WARSAW, Poland — The Board of the Jewish Community of Warsaw cancelled a celebration of Poland’s Independence Day in the city’s historic Nozyk synagogue, reportedly citing security concerns.

The Jewish community learned of the cancellation Thursday, the eve of the scheduled celebration, which was to be held on Independence Day.

Among the scheduled speakers were Anna Chipczynska, president of the Board of the Jewish Community of Warsaw; Polish chief rabbi Michael Schudrich, who was to recite a prayer for Poland, and Anna Cialowicz, author of an anthology of pre-World War II articles titled “My Jewish Warsaw.”

Attendees of the ceremony were to have been limited to members of the Jewish community and guests invited by the board.

The event was cancelled to ensure the safety of members of the community in the face of security warnings, the news website Jewish.pl reported. Chipczynska did not respond to a JTA query about the nature of the warnings.

The prayers for Poland were included in the Nozyk Synagogue’s Friday morning prayers and in the Ec Chaim progressive synagogue’s Saturday morning prayers, according to the website.

On November 11, 1918, Poland gained its independence and returned to the map of Europe. In honor of the day, the largest Polish cities hold marches and sports and cultural events. Marches through the streets of Warsaw were attended by about 80,000 people this year. Polish Minister of Internal Affairs and Administration Mariusz Blaszczak said after the march that Warsaw was secured during the events.

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