Ex-Russian spy’s daughter discharged from hospital after poisoning
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Ex-Russian spy’s daughter discharged from hospital after poisoning

British media say Yulia Skripal, who was in critical condition after being attacked in Britain alongside her father, taken to ‘secure location’

An image of the daughter of former Russian Spy Sergei Skripal, Yulia Skripal, taken from Yulia Skipal's Facebook account on March 6, 2018. (Yulia Skripal/Facebook via AP)
An image of the daughter of former Russian Spy Sergei Skripal, Yulia Skripal, taken from Yulia Skipal's Facebook account on March 6, 2018. (Yulia Skripal/Facebook via AP)

LONDON, United Kingdom — Yulia Skripal, who was poisoned with a nerve agent in the English city of Salisbury last month along with her Russian ex-spy father, has been discharged from the hospital.

The hospital said the 33-year-old was released on Monday, and the BBC reported she was taken to a secure location, while her father Sergei Skripal remains in the hospital. His release date has not been set.

Officials said Tuesday Yulia Skripal will continue to need medical care as she recovers from the March 4 attack.

Dr. Christine Blanshard said: “This is not the end of her treatment but marks a significant milestone.”

In a statement last week, staff at Salisbury hospital said of Yulia Skripal: “Her strength is growing daily and she can look forward to the day when she is well enough to leave the hospital.”

Former Russian military intelligence colonel Sergei Skripal attends a hearing at the Moscow District Military Court in Moscow on August 9, 2006. (AFP PHOTO / Kommersant Photo / Yuri SENATOROV)

Her father, a former Russian military official who sold secrets to Britain before moving there in a 2010 spy swap, was also said to be “responding well to treatment, improving rapidly and no longer in a critical condition.”

Britain and its allies have blamed Russia for carrying out the attack, the first offensive use of a nerve agent in Europe since World War II, sparking a major diplomatic crisis.

The incident triggered a wave of tit-for-tat diplomatic expulsions and inflamed tensions between Russia and Western governments.

The Kremlin denies any involvement, while Britain says the poisoning was carried out with a military-grade nerve agent developed by the Soviet Union.

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