Half of Americans want Congress to reject Iran deal — poll
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Half of Americans want Congress to reject Iran deal — poll

CNN survey finds 52% of Americans say agreement on Iran nuclear capabilities should be nixed, while 44% support pact

President Barack Obama answers questions about the Iran nuclear deal during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, July 15, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
President Barack Obama answers questions about the Iran nuclear deal during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, July 15, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

A little over half of Americans want Congress to reject the Iran nuclear deal, according to a new CNN/ORC poll. Fifty-two percent of respondents said that Congress should reject the agreement, while 44% said Congress should approve it.

The poll showed President Barack Obama’s approval ratings remained more or less constant at 49%, down just 1% from June, while the deal was described by some as his greatest achievement.

Congress has 60 days from July 14 to review the nuclear deal reached earlier this month between Iran and six world powers. American lawmakers then have the option of voting to approve or disapprove of the deal, or take no action. Obama has vowed to veto any vote that disapproves of the deal.

The July poll found that the public was split along party lines, with 66% of Republicans saying Congress should reject the deal, and 61% of Democrats saying Congress should approve the deal.

The deal was more favored by younger and college-educated respondents than by older and less educated respondents.

Those for and against the agreement are engaged in a verbal battle to lobby lawmakers.

Opposition to the deal may stem from public uncertainty, as close to two-thirds of Americans had said in late June that they did not believe that an agreement would be reached with Iran that would prevent the Islamic Republic from acquiring a nuclear weapon, a CNN/ORC poll found.

AP contributed to this report.

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