Hyper Cacher victim’s father knew his son ‘would fight’
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Hyper Cacher victim’s father knew his son ‘would fight’

Binyamin Hattab says Yoav’s last text was about the difficulties for Jews in France

Yoav Hattab, 21, was one of four victims of the deadly terrorist attack at a kosher supermarket in Paris, on January 9, 2015. (photo credit: Courtesy)
Yoav Hattab, 21, was one of four victims of the deadly terrorist attack at a kosher supermarket in Paris, on January 9, 2015. (photo credit: Courtesy)

The father of Yoav Hattab, 21, who was killed in the Paris supermarket attack last week, said on Friday that, as the attack unfolded, he knew his son had gone down fighting.

Hattab was shot to death after he snatched a rifle from the market terrorist, Amedy Coulibaly, but the weapon was jammed, and he was killed immediately. Three other Jewish men — Phillipe Barham, Yohan Cohen, and François-Michel Saada — were also killed in the siege at the Hyper Cacher market. All four were buried in Jerusalem.

In a letter published on Chabad.org on Friday, Rabbi Binyamin Hattab, the chief rabbi of Tunisia, praised his son’s bravery and commitment to religious tradition.

Last Friday, when the family was informed of the hostage crisis, and were told several people had been killed, “I told those around me, in tears, that I was sure Yoav was one of them,” he wrote in Hebrew.

“Because Yoav was not one to stand quietly, watch a terrorist try to kill others and let it pass in silence. I was sure he would fight, would do anything he could, even risk his life, to try and stop the savage murderer,” wrote Hattab.

“And several hours later, it became clear my gut feeling was right.”

Rabbi Benjamin Hattab, the father of Yoav Hattab, who was killed in the Pairs kosher supermarket atack, rips his shirt in a Jewish sign of mourning during the funeral for his son and three other men killed in the attack, Tuesday, January 13, 2015 (screen capture: Channel 2)
Rabbi Binyamin Hattab, the father of Yoav Hattab, who was killed in the Paris kosher supermarket attack, rips his shirt in a Jewish sign of mourning during the funeral for his son and three other men killed in the attack, January 13, 2015. (screen capture: Channel 2)

Hattab said his son, who was killed late Friday afternoon, “especially loved Shabbat,” and would encourage his friends to observe it.

His last text message before he entered the Hyper Cacher market was to a friend on the subject, added his father.

“One of the last sentences he typed there was, ‘the situation for Jews in France is not good,’ try to do at least something [for Shabbat],” Binyamin Hattab wrote.

Hattab concluded his letter with a request “to continue Yoav’s embrace of life, to perpetuate it, to be infected by his love and to try to love the Jewish people even more.”

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