In Mexico, Trump says US has ‘right’ to build wall
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In Mexico, Trump says US has ‘right’ to build wall

GOP nominee, who previously derided the country as a source of rapists and criminals, praises Mexicans as ‘amazing people’

Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto, left, and then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump shake hands after a joint statement at Los Pinos, the presidential official residence, in Mexico City this past August. (AP/Marco Ugarte)
Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto, left, and then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump shake hands after a joint statement at Los Pinos, the presidential official residence, in Mexico City this past August. (AP/Marco Ugarte)

MEXICO CITY — On Mexican soil for the first time as the Republican presidential nominee, a firm but measured Donald Trump defended the right of the United States to build a massive border wall along its southern flank, standing up for the centerpiece of his immigration plan in a country where he is widely despised.

Trump, who previously derided Mexico as a source of rapists and criminals, praised Mexicans Wednesday as “amazing people” following a closed-door meeting at the official residence of the country’s president, Enrique Pena Nieto. Trump and the Mexican president, who has compared the New York billionaire to Adolf Hitler, addressed reporters from adjacent lecterns before a Mexican flag.

With political risks high for both men, Trump stayed on script.

“Having a secure border is a sovereign right and mutually beneficial,” Trump said, reading from prepared remarks. “We recognize and respect the right of any country to build a physical barrier or wall on any of its borders to stop the illegal movement of people, drugs and weapons. Cooperation toward achieving this shared objective — and it will be shared — of safety for all citizens is paramount to both the United States and to Mexico.”

He acknowledged, however, that they did not discuss who will pay for the wall, despite Trump persistently stating throughout his campaign that Mexico will foot the bill for the highly controversial project.

“We didn’t discuss that. We didn’t discuss who pays for the wall,” Trump said.

US presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a joint press conference with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto in Mexico City on August 31, 2016.  (AFP)
US presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a joint press conference with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto in Mexico City on August 31, 2016. (AFP)

Peña Nieto said the Mexican people have been hurt by Trump’s past comments that painted them in a negative light.

Peña Nieto told reporters following the meeting that “misinterpretation or assertions” had negatively impacted perceptions of Trump’s candidacy.

He added that, the “Mexican people have been hurt by the comments that had been made.” But he said he’s sure that Trump is genuinely interested in building a relationship that will benefit both countries.

Peña Nieto spoke in Spanish throughout, and he and Trump shook hands as the session ended.

Trump’s trip, 10 weeks before America’s presidential Election Day, came just hours before the Republican nominee was to deliver a highly anticipated speech in Arizona about illegal immigration. That has been a defining issue of his presidential campaign, but also one on which he’s appeared to waver in recent days

Trump’s presence on Wednesday, his first meeting with a head of state abroad as a presidential candidate, sparked anger and protests across Mexico’s capital city. A former Mexican president bluntly told the celebrity businessman that, despite Pena Nieto’s hospitality, he was not welcome.

A demonstrator protesting Donald Trump's meeting with the Mexican president holds up a book jacket with the title; "Stop Trump!" during a morning protest at the Angel of Independence Monument that drew just a handful of people, in Mexico City, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. (AP/Rebecca Blackwell)
A demonstrator protesting Donald Trump’s meeting with the Mexican president holds up a book jacket with the title; “Stop Trump!” during a morning protest at the Angel of Independence Monument that drew just a handful of people, in Mexico City, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. (AP/Rebecca Blackwell)

“We don’t like him. We don’t want him. We reject his visit,” former President Vicente Fox told CNN, calling the trip a “political stunt.”

After saying during his Republican primary campaign he would use a “deportation force” to expel all of the estimated 11 million people living in the United States illegally, Trump suggested last week he could soften that stance. But he still says he plans to build a huge wall — paid for by Mexico — along the two nations’ border. He was under pressure to clarify just where he stands in the speech that had been rescheduled several times.

Trump’s running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, told CBS earlier in the day that Trump would make clear “that there will be no path to legalization, no path to citizenship. People will need to leave the country to be able to obtain legal status or obtain citizenship.”

The buildup to the speech was abruptly interrupted Tuesday night by the news that Trump would visit Mexico, accepting on short notice an invitation offered last week by Pena Nieto. The newspaper El Universal wrote in an editorial that Trump “caught Mexican diplomats off guard.”

Campaigning in Ohio earlier in the day, Democrat Hillary Clinton jabbed at Trump’s Mexican appearance as she promoted her own experience working with foreign leaders as the nation’s chief diplomat.

“People have to get to know that they can count on you, that you won’t say one thing one day and something totally different the next,” she told the American Legion in Cincinnati. “And it certainly takes more than trying to make up for a year of insults and insinuations by dropping in on our neighbors for a few hours and then flying home again.”

Pena Nieto made his invitation to both Trump and Clinton, who met with him in Mexico in 2014. The inclusion of Trump puzzled many in Mexico, who said it wasn’t clear why their own unpopular president would agree to meet with someone so widely disliked in his country.

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