In Ukraine, rabbis help immigrants-to-be prove their Jewishness
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In Ukraine, rabbis help immigrants-to-be prove their Jewishness

New office in Dnepropetrovsk is designed to facilitate aliya to Israel under Law of Return

Jewish refugees from eastern Ukraine celebrate a simulated Passover 'seder' meal at The Jewish Agency's refugee center outside Dnipropetrovsk ahead of their immigration to Israel, March 29, 2015. (photo credit: The Jewish Agency/Vlad Tomilov)
Jewish refugees from eastern Ukraine celebrate a simulated Passover 'seder' meal at The Jewish Agency's refugee center outside Dnipropetrovsk ahead of their immigration to Israel, March 29, 2015. (photo credit: The Jewish Agency/Vlad Tomilov)

Rabbis from Israel and Ukraine opened an office in eastern Ukraine that will help prospective immigrants to Israel prove they are Jewish.

The office, which opened last week in Dnepropetrovsk, aims to facilitate the process for people who seek to immigrate to Israel under its Law of Return for Jews and their kin and is the joint initiative of the Jewish Community of Dnepropetrovsk, the Tzohar rabbinic organization, the Triguboff Institute and the Shorashim organization.

“It will prevent situations in which there is no ability to prove a Jewish origin once aliyah to Israel was made and the documents were left behind,” representatives of the groups involved in the office wrote in a joint statement published Tuesday. Aliyah is the Hebrew word for Jewish immigration to Israel.

The process of proving a Jewish ancestry has become especially difficult for thousands of Jews from eastern Ukraine, where a stagnant civil war has resulted in loss of access to documents that may help to establish such a family connection.

The new office’s opening was attended by a delegation of rabbis from Israel, including David Stav, chief rabbi of the city of Shoham and chairman of the Tzohar organization, which helps to involve non-religious couples and their families in religious wedding ceremonies and other life-cycle events.

“There is no bigger aid for a Jew than helping him to prove his Jewish status and consequently his identity as a Jew,” Stav said during a meeting with Rabbi Shmuel Kaminezki, the chief rabbi of Dnepropetrovsk and one of the country’s most influential rabbis.

Kaminezki said the new office will be “saving lives,” adding he will refer many applicants to the new office and “supply an abundance of work” to its staff.

Aliyah from Ukraine totaled 5,840 individuals in 2014 – a 190 percent increase over 2013, when the unrest that led to the fighting began. More than 6,000 people from Ukraine have come so far in 2015.

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