Israel braces for annual UN bashing over Palestinians
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Israel braces for annual UN bashing over Palestinians

Pro-Palestinian resolutions to include condemning West Bank settlements and blaming Jewish state for all violence

Stuart Winer is a breaking news editor at The Times of Israel.

The United Nations General Assembly hall in New York (photo credit: CC BY-linh.m.do/Flickr/File)
The United Nations General Assembly hall in New York (photo credit: CC BY-linh.m.do/Flickr/File)

The United Nations General Assembly was scheduled Monday to vote on a series of decisions condemning Israel for, among other things, its settlement policy, damaging the character of Jerusalem and bearing responsibility for the violence in the conflict with the Palestinians — but without recalling the recent spate of Palestinian terror attacks on Israelis.

The UN vote on decisions lambasting Israel is an annual event sponsored by the Palestinians and usually held on November 29, marked in the world body as the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People.

Since November 29 this year falls on a Sunday, and in the US, Thanksgiving is this coming Thursday, the UN voting session was brought forward to Monday, the Hebrew-language Ynet website reported.

Israel’s Ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon blasted the nature of the decisions, which generally contain no mention of any wrongdoing on the part of the Palestinians. According to Danon, there have been 174 terror attacks against Israelis by Palestinians in the past few weeks.

“Instead of condemning the Palestinians because of the terror, the incitement, the lies, the international community continues to give them discounts and prizes,” he told Ynet, referring to some of the UN motions that call for continued funding of Palestinian advocacy organizations.

Israeli Ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon addresses the UN Security Council, October 22, 2015. (Permanent Mission of Israel to the UN)
Israeli Ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon addresses the UN Security Council, October 22, 2015. (Permanent Mission of Israel to the UN)

Danon said he hoped the Israeli delegation would succeed in impressing on European countries, who are currently facing terror attacks and threats from the Islamic State group, that “the Palestinians glorify terror instead of the value of life and the time has come for the international community to condemn the terror conducted against Israel.”

A total of 20 decisions are scheduled to be voted on, including condemnations Jewish settlements in the West Bank, a call for Israel to withdraw from the West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Golan Heights, the return of Palestinian exiles — including to within Israel’s borders, and condemnation of Israel for changing the character of Jerusalem, disrupting the status quo on the Temple Mount, and deliberate provocations.

The decisions are all expected to pass with the support of Arab states and the Non-Aligned bloc of nations, although Danon hoped to convince delegates from Western countries not to support the votes, the report said.

General Assembly decisions cannot be enforced on member states through sanctions or other means, as is the privilege of the smaller UN Security Council, and are considered mostly symbolic.

November 29 marks the anniversary of the date in 1947 when the UN voted to partition Palestine into Jewish and Arab states, paving the way for the creation of Israel. It’s also the date in 2012 when the UN voted to recognize Palestine as a non-member observer state, considered a major milestone in the Palestinian’s statehood drive.

The recent violence began nearly three months ago amid tensions surrounding the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem. In mid-September, Palestinian protesters clashed with Israeli forces almost every day. By October, the violence escalated to near-daily stabbings and shootings, mainly in Jerusalem and the West Bank, but central Israel has also seen some attacks.

Palestinians claim Israel is planning to change the status quo on the Mount, where Jews can visit but not pray. Israel has vehemently denied the claim.

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