search

Israel says it ‘hasn’t been given all the details’ on Iran accord

National security adviser claims Jerusalem left in the dark on ‘side deals’ between Iran and UN atomic watchdog

Yossi Cohen at the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee on September 2, 2014 (Noam Revkin Fenton/ Flash 90)
Yossi Cohen at the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee on September 2, 2014 (Noam Revkin Fenton/ Flash 90)

National Security Adviser Yossi Cohen claimed Wednesday that Israel has yet to be informed of the full details of the nuclear accord between six world powers and Iran.

“Contrary to promises, Israel has not yet received all the written supplements to the agreement signed between Iran and the world powers,” Cohen, a former deputy head of the Mossad, told members of the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee.

He specified what he described as “confidential” appendices to the accord, relating to understandings reached between Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

US lawmakers have demanded more details on the agreements reached between the IAEA and Iran with the consent of the P5+1 group of world powers. Those agreements were not previously revealed to Congress as part of the 60-day review process required under law.

But the White House denied there being any “side deals” and said it was “standard practice” not to publicly release “technical arrangements” with the IAEA, offering assurances that US experts were familiar and comfortable with the contents.

As an example of the Western powers’ alleged attempts to keep Israel in the dark, Cohen recalled last week’s visit of Hans-Dieter Lucas, the German representative to the Iran nuclear talks, in Israel.

Cohen noted that although the senior German diplomat had come to discuss the agreement with Israeli leaders, he refrained from providing information on several key issues.

He added that the Israeli government is struggling to accurately assess the implications of the agreement, since it “lacks the entire picture.”

Secretary of State John Kerry, center, flanked by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, right, and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 28, 2015, before the House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on the Iran Nuclear Agreement. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Secretary of State John Kerry, center, flanked by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, right, and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 28, 2015, before the House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on the Iran Nuclear Agreement. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Iran nuclear deal has supercharged US congressional lobbying, with President Barack Obama securing the support of a prominent Jewish Democrat and pro-Israel groups pressuring lawmakers in an all-out, big-money drive.

Obama, his cabinet and other allies are making the case that the deal, which calls on Iran to curb its nuclear program in exchange for billions of dollars in sanctions relief, is the best possible way to prevent Tehran from developing a nuclear weapon.

Congress has begun a 60-day review of the international agreement, with a vote expected in September. If the Republican-controlled Congress passes a resolution of disapproval for the deal, Obama has said he will veto it. The administration is hoping to secure the backing of Democrats to sustain the veto.

AP contributed to this report.

read more:
comments
Never miss breaking news on Israel
Get notifications to stay updated
You're subscribed