Police compiled criminal file on all 120 Knesset members — report
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Police compiled criminal file on all 120 Knesset members — report

TV report says secret document has info on dozens of offenses allegedly committed by lawmakers

Israeli Police Commander Menny Yitzhaki attends a State control committee meeting in the Knesset on February 18, 2014 (Flash 90)
Israeli Police Commander Menny Yitzhaki attends a State control committee meeting in the Knesset on February 18, 2014 (Flash 90)

A secret document compiled by Israel Police in 2014 contains extensive information on all of the Knesset’s 120 members at the time, and includes evidence regarding alleged offenses committed by dozens of them, Channel 10 News reported Monday.

The document, reportedly drawn up on the instructions of the head of police’s Investigations and Intelligence Department Meni Yitzhaki, is said to include information on alleged corruption cases and other crimes which could form the basis for criminal investigations.

The Channel 10 report noted that Yitzhaki’s predecessor Yoav Segalovich had expressly forbidden the creation of such documents, out of concern that they could be exploited by interested parties to target politicians of their choosing.

Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit on Monday confirmed the document’s existence.

Mandelblit, who took office in January, told Channel 10 the file was intended for internal review purposes, to monitor whether there was information on probes into politicians that he had not been made aware of.

In a statement to Channel 10 News on Monday, police did not confirm or deny the existence of the document, saying only that Yitzhaki’s policy was “to check any intelligence information professionally and thoroughly and to carry out any procedures mandated [by his job] to the fullest.”

The police denied systematically gathering information against Knesset members in order to check whether they had been involved in wrongdoing, and stressed that any investigation against a lawmaker requires the authorization of the attorney general.

They added that all information-gathering was done according to law and “with appropriate sensitivity.”

They stressed that any evidence that raised substantial suspicions against a member of the Knesset was immediately sent to the attorney general or the state prosecutor for review.

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