The Met to open exhibit on medieval Jerusalem
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The Met to open exhibit on medieval Jerusalem

Over 200 works of art by some 60 lenders from across the world will be on display at NY museum starting September 26

Screenshot from a work of art to be displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York about Jerusalem in the years 1000-1400. (Courtesy)
Screenshot from a work of art to be displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York about Jerusalem in the years 1000-1400. (Courtesy)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is launching an exhibition on Jerusalem in the Middle Ages starting later this month.

The exhibit, “Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven” is set to open September 26, and will run until January 8, next year.

With over 200 works of art on display by 60 lenders from across the world, the exhibit “will illuminate the key role that the Holy City played in shaping the art of the period from 1000 to 1400,” according to the Met.

Almost 50 pieces will come directly from Jerusalem, “including key loans from its religious communities, some of which have never before shared their treasures outside their walls,” the Met added.

“While Jerusalem is often described as a city of three faiths… the city was home to multiple cultures, faiths, and languages…This will be the first exhibition to unravel the various cultural traditions and aesthetic strands that enriched and enlivened the medieval city,” according to the exhibition overview.

Melanie Holcomb, a curator of Medieval Arts at the museum said that the exhibit is “really about Jerusalem as an inspiration for works of art, but we also have works of art made by people who never lay eyes on the city.”

“It’s not Jerusalem on the ground, but that Jerusalem of the spiritual imagination,” she added in a promotional video of the exhibit.

Barbara Boehm, a senior curator, said the exhibit has “everything from a prayer book made for an Armenian queen and princess to capitals from Nazareth with saints and demons. And there are manuscript illuminations.”

The exhibit “will bear witness to the crucial role that the city has played in shaping world culture,” the Met added.

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