The Times of Israel liveblogged Thursday’s events as they happened.

US condemns ‘incredibly horrifying’ strike on Ukraine village

Ukrainian policemen carry bodies out of a destroyed shop and cafe after a Russian strike in the village of Groza, some 30 kilometers west of Kupiansk, eastern Ukraine, on October 5, 2023 (Anatolii Stepanov/AFP)
Ukrainian policemen carry bodies out of a destroyed shop and cafe after a Russian strike in the village of Groza, some 30 kilometers west of Kupiansk, eastern Ukraine, on October 5, 2023 (Anatolii Stepanov/AFP)

The White House condemns a “horrifying” strike that killed at least 51 people in a village in eastern Ukraine, saying the attack underscores the need to keep supporting Kyiv against Russia.

“It is incredibly horrifying for the people of Ukraine,” Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre tells a briefing. “This is why we’re doing everything that we can to help Ukraine.”

Military says concrete structure that violated Blue Line on Lebanon border removed

The Israeli military says that during engineering work on the Lebanon border yesterday, troops identified a concrete structure that violated the so-called Blue Line by 2-4 meters, near the northern town of Shtula.

The Israel Defense Forces says it worked with the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon, or UNIFIL, to have the structure removed.

Earlier today, the structure was dismantled by the Lebanese Army, the IDF says.

Israel and Lebanon do not have a formal border due to territorial disputes; however, they largely abide by the Blue Line. The line is marked with blue barrels along the border and in some areas is several meters from the Israeli fence, which is built entirely within Israeli territory.

The incident comes months after the Lebanese Hezbollah terror group erected two tents over the Blue Line in the contested Mount Dov region on the border, and has only moved one of them back over to Lebanon.

IDF says troops shoot suspected terrorist who opened fire at Israeli family

The Israel Defense Forces says troops have shot the suspected Palestinian terrorist who opened fire at an Israeli family driving through the West Bank town of Huwara earlier.

In a brief statement, the IDF says the suspect has been “neutralized,” and that it will provide further details later.

Earlier, the gunman shot at an Israeli family on the Route 60 highway, before fleeing the scene. The parents, aged 25, and their baby were unharmed.

World’s oldest near-complete copy of Bible arrives in Israel for permanent display

Codex Sassoon, the world’s oldest Hebrew Bible. (Courtesy of Sotheby's via JTA)
Codex Sassoon, the world’s oldest Hebrew Bible. (Courtesy of Sotheby's via JTA)

The Codex Sassoon, the world’s oldest nearly complete copy of the Hebrew Bible, has arrived in Israel and is set to be permanently displayed at ANU Museum of the Jewish People in Tel Aviv.

Earlier this year American attorney Alfred Moses, 94, purchased the book for more than $38 million, on behalf of the museum.

Before Moses bought the book at a much-anticipated Sotheby’s auction on May 17, the codex passed between multiple owners — most recently through the hands of Jacqui Safra, a member of the prominent banking family, and before him, in the 1920s, Jewish book collector David Solomon Sassoon.

The book was written by a single Jewish scribe on 400 pages of parchment about 1,100 years ago.

JTA contributed to this report.

IAF cuts down pilot training hours due to reservists not showing up — report

Channel 12 reports that the Israel Air Force’s flight school has slightly cut down flight hours for pilots in training due to the large number of reservist instructors who are failing to shop up for service.

Many reservist pilots have stopped volunteering for army service in protest of the government’s judicial overhaul, which they believe will cause grievous harm to democracy.

Reporter Nir Dvori says military officials insist the reduction in flight hours per pilot is limited and, for now, is not causing serious harm to the training process.

Putin: Russia tested nuclear-powered missile, could revoke global atomic test ban

Russia has successfully tested an experimental nuclear-powered cruise missile, President Vladimir Putin says, while also warning that the country’s parliament could revoke its ratification of a treaty banning nuclear tests.

In a speech at a forum of foreign policy experts, Putin announces that Russia has effectively completed the development of the Burevestnik cruise missile and the Sarmat heavy intercontinental ballistic missile and will work on putting them into production.

“We conducted the last successful test of the Burevestnik nuclear-powered global-range cruise missile,” he says without elaborating. His statement was the first announcement of a successful test of the Burevestnik, which translates as “Storm Petrel.” It was first mentioned by Putin in 2018.

Little is known about the Burevestnik, which was code-named Skyfall by NATO, and many Western experts have been skeptical about it, noting that a nuclear engine could be highly unreliable.

It is believed to be able to carry a nuclear warhead or a conventional one, and potentially could stay aloft for a much longer time than other missiles and cover much more distance, thanks to nuclear propulsion.

Defense minister warns of potential major operation in West Bank

Defense Minister Yoav Gallant addresses a press conference with his German coounterpart after signing a declaration of Intent on the Arrow 3 missile defense system, at the German defense ministry in Berlin on September 28, 2023. (Tobias Schwarz/AFP)
Defense Minister Yoav Gallant addresses a press conference with his German coounterpart after signing a declaration of Intent on the Arrow 3 missile defense system, at the German defense ministry in Berlin on September 28, 2023. (Tobias Schwarz/AFP)

Defense Minister Yoav Gallant threatens Palestinian gunmen in Tulkarem of a potential wide-scale military operation, while visiting troops wounded during clashes in the West Bank city earlier.

“We will reach anywhere and attack anyone who tries to harm Israeli citizens and IDF soldiers,” Gallant says from Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva, according to remarks provided by his office.

“Those who need examples of what we can do, should remember our actions in Jenin two months ago,” he says, referring to a major two-day operation in the northern West Bank city in July.

“If necessary, we will do this in other places,” Gallant adds.

ADL to resume advertising on Musk’s X despite lingering antisemitism concerns

Elon Musk at the Vivatech technology startups and innovation fair at the Porte de Versailles exhibition center in Paris, on June 16, 2023. (Alain Jocard/AFP)
Elon Musk at the Vivatech technology startups and innovation fair at the Porte de Versailles exhibition center in Paris, on June 16, 2023. (Alain Jocard/AFP)

Following weeks during which Elon Musk has attacked the Anti-Defamation League and threatened to sue it for billions of dollars, the Jewish civil rights group announces that it will resume advertising on X, the social media platform Musk owns.

In a statement on Wednesday, the ADL says X, along with similar sites, still “has a serious issue with antisemites and other extremists using these platforms to push their hateful ideas and, in some cases, bully Jewish and other users.”

But the group cites declarations by the leadership of X, which Musk renamed from Twitter, that it would combat antisemitism.

Musk has had live-streamed conversations recently with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as well as a group of largely right-leaning Jewish men in which he spoke out against antisemitism while also emphasizing his commitment to free speech.

Also last week, X CEO Linda Yaccarino said the platform is taking steps to counter antisemitism.

American tourist suspected of vandalizing statues at Israel Museum, citing ‘Torah’

A sculpture smashed by an American tourist at Jerusalem's Israel Museum due to what he said was a violation of the Bible, on Oct. 5, 2023 (Israel Museum)
A sculpture smashed by an American tourist at Jerusalem's Israel Museum due to what he said was a violation of the Bible, on Oct. 5, 2023 (Israel Museum)

Police arrest an American tourist in his 40s suspected of smashing and vandalizing several statues at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

In his initial questioning, the tourist said the statues were “against the Torah.”

The extent of the damage to and the number of art pieces vandalized is not immediately clear.

The tourist was apparently referring to one of the Ten Commandments: “Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image.”

He is expected to be brought before a judge tomorrow.

Itamar Ben Gvir visits troops injured in Tulkarem operation overnight

National Security Minister Itamar Ben Gvir visits troops injured in the Tulkarem operation overnight at Beilinson Medical Center in Petah Tikva.

Ben Gvir vows to “continue to fight terror, and to deal it a severe blow.”

Putin says Russia’s mission is to create ‘new world’

This pool photograph distributed by Russian state owned agency Sputnik shows Russian President Vladimir Putin attending the plenary session of the Valdai Discussion Club forum in Sochi on October 5, 2023. (Sergei GUNEYEV / POOL / AFP)
This pool photograph distributed by Russian state owned agency Sputnik shows Russian President Vladimir Putin attending the plenary session of the Valdai Discussion Club forum in Sochi on October 5, 2023. (Sergei GUNEYEV / POOL / AFP)

Russian President Vladimir Putin says that Russia’s mission is to create a “new world” and blames Western hegemony for Moscow’s grinding offensive in Ukraine.

Putin has portrayed Russia’s full-scale military intervention in Ukraine — launched in February 2022 — as part of a long-standing confrontation with the West.

“We are tasked, essentially, with building a new world,” Putin says, adding the West is aiming for global “hegemony.”

“The West always needs an enemy,” he says.

As Moscow grows more isolated in the West and faces unprecedented sanctions over its Ukraine campaign, Putin accuses the West of trying to create a “new Iron Curtain” with Russia.

“Europe is fencing itself off from us and creating a new Iron Curtain,” says Putin, who served in the Soviet KGB.

“We are not the ones shutting the door. It’s Europe that’s shutting the door,” he adds.

Settler leader: Right-wing government failing time after time to bring security

Samaria Regional Council head Yossi Dagan at a protest against the government plan to cut down the number of new housing units planned to be built on the West Bank, outside the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem, May 8, 2022. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
Samaria Regional Council head Yossi Dagan at a protest against the government plan to cut down the number of new housing units planned to be built on the West Bank, outside the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem, May 8, 2022. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

Head of the Samaria Regional Council Yossi Dagan criticizes the government following the latest shooting in Huwara.

“The right-wing government has failed time after time to bring security to Israelis in the center of the country,” Dagan says in a statement.

He says “we will not accept a situation in which time after time [terrorists] target and attempt to murder Jews.”

Dagan demands “an immediate return of checkpoints to the heart of Samaria” and a widespread military operation in Palestinian towns to root out terrorists.

“We expect results from the government. We expect our national honor to be restored and we expect security.”

Dashcam footage shows moment of shooting attack in Huwara

Dashcam footage shows the moment of the terror shooting attack in the West Bank town of Huwara.

The clip shows the Palestinian gunman approaching the Israelis’ car and opening fire multiple times.

The car drives over to the opposite lane in an attempt to flee, as the terrorist continues to fire.

There were no injuries in the attack, and the gunman managed to flee.

“IDF soldiers are setting up roadblocks in the area, and have begun a pursuit after the terrorist,” the military says.

The Israeli couple aged 25 and their one-and-a-half-year-old daughter were physically unharmed in the attack.

Yiska Steiner, who was in the car during the attack, says she was returning to Jerusalem after going on a trip with her family to the illegal Giv’ot Olam outpost.

“In the middle of Huwara… we heard a loud boom. They shot at us in the back window. They shot twice. My husband moved to the other lane, and drove in the opposite direction,” she tells the TPS news agency.

Police footage shows overnight clash with Palestinian gunmen, grenade blast

Police publish footage of Border Police officers clashing with Palestinian gunmen in a refugee camp in the West Bank city of Tulkarem this morning.

The headcam video shows the moment a hand grenade exploded, wounding five officers, including three seriously.

According to an initial probe, an officer hurled the grenade toward Palestinian gunmen, but hit a metal gate and bounced back. Another officer managed to kick the grenade to the side, moments before it exploded.

Israeli motorist reports coming under fire in West Bank town of Huwara

An Israeli motorist reports coming under fire on the Route 60 highway in the West Bank town of Huwara.

The Rescuers Without Borders emergency service says the driver and passengers are physically unharmed in the suspected attack, but one person is being treated for acute anxiety.

The rear window of the car is shattered, and a bullet was found in the car, the service says.

There is no immediate comment from the military.

Drone attack in Syria kills and wounds officers and civilians at a military ceremony

A drone attack strikes a packed graduation ceremony for military officers in the Syrian city of Homs, killing an unspecified number of civilians and military personnel and wounding dozens of others, Syrian state television reports.

Syria’s military says in a statement that drones laden with explosives targeted the ceremony as it came to an end. They accuse insurgents “backed by known international forces” of the attack, and say that some of the wounded are in critical condition, including women and children.

They don’t specify the number of casualties and don’t accuse anyone in particular of carrying out the deadly strike. No group immediately claims responsibility for the attack.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based war monitor with questionable veracity and unclear funding, claims at least 60 have been killed.

The Syrian military in its statement says “that it will respond with full force and decisiveness to these terrorist organizations wherever they exist.”

Iran slams West over remarks on hospitalized teen

Iran lashes out at “biased remarks” from Western countries after the allegations that a teenage girl was critically wounded in a confrontation with security agents on Tehran’s subway.

Iran has denied Garawand was assaulted, with the official news agency IRNA saying the student fainted due to “a drop in blood pressure” as she tried to board a train.

On Wednesday, diplomats from the United States and Germany reacted to the incident.

“Once again a young woman in Iran is fighting for her life. Just because she showed her hair on the subway,” German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock wrote on X, formerly Twitter.

Abram Paley, the acting US special envoy on Iran, posted on X that Washington was “shocked and concerned about reports that Iran’s so-called morality police have assaulted” the teenager.

Iran’s foreign ministry spokesman Nasser Kanani hits back.

“Instead of interventionist and biased remarks and expressing insincere concern over Iranian women and girls, you’d better be concerned about US, German and UK healthcare personnel, patients and tackle their situation,” he writes on X.

Masood Dorosti, managing director of the Tehran subway system, denies there was “any verbal or physical conflict” between Garawand and “passengers or metro staff.”

Mysterious injury of Iranian teen without headcover in Tehran’s Metro sparks anger

In this image from surveillance video aired by Iranian state television, women pull 16-year-old Armita Geravand from a train car on the Tehran Metro in Tehran, Iran, October 1, 2023. (Iranian state television/AP)
In this image from surveillance video aired by Iranian state television, women pull 16-year-old Armita Geravand from a train car on the Tehran Metro in Tehran, Iran, October 1, 2023. (Iranian state television/AP)

A mysterious injury suffered by a 16-year-old girl who boarded a Metro train in Iran’s capital without a headscarf has reignited anger just after the one-year anniversary of the death of Mahsa Amini and the nationwide protests it sparked.

What happened in the few seconds after Armita Geravand entered the train on Sunday remains in question. While a friend told Iranian state television that she hit her head on the station’s platform, the soundless footage aired by the broadcaster from outside of the car is blocked by a bystander. Just seconds later, her limp body is carried off.

The Hengaw Organization for Human Rights, which reports on abuses in Iran’s western Kurdish region, published a photograph it said showed Geravand at the hospital, her head wrapped in bandages as she remains in a coma.

Geravand’s mother and father appeared in state media footage saying a blood pressure issue, a fall or perhaps both contributed to their daughter’s injury.

Activists abroad have alleged Geravand may have been pushed or attacked because she was not wearing the hijab. They demand an independent investigation by the United Nations’ fact-finding mission on Iran, citing the theocracy’s use of pressure on victims’ families and state TV’s history of airing hundreds of coerced confessions.

Geravand’s injury also comes as Iran has put its morality police — whom activists implicate in Amini’s death over her alleged loose hijab — back on the street, and as lawmakers push to enforce even stricter penalties for those flouting the required head covering.

“Girls are subjected to violence on the streets, and then their families are compelled to protect the government responsible for that violence,” says Hadi Ghaemi, the executive director of the New York-based Center for Human Rights in Iran.

Former PM Olmert worked for blacklisted Israeli company behind attack spyware

Former prime minister Ehud Olmert arrives for a court hearing on the lawsuit of the Netanyahu family against him, at the Tel Aviv Magistrate's Court on June 12, 2022. (Avshalom Sassoni/Flash90)
Former prime minister Ehud Olmert arrives for a court hearing on the lawsuit of the Netanyahu family against him, at the Tel Aviv Magistrate's Court on June 12, 2022. (Avshalom Sassoni/Flash90)

Former prime minister Ehud Olmert worked for an Israeli company that creates attack spyware and which is blacklisted by the US for its alleged use by authoritarian regimes, Haaretz reports, as part of a joint investigation with major international news organizations.

Olmert tells Haaretz he did advisory work for Intellexa in the past. Neither he nor the report provide further details.

In July, the US Commerce Department said Intellexa dealt in exploits to break into IT systems, “threatening the privacy and security of individuals and organizations worldwide.”

Intellexa, along with Cytrox, is behind the spyware called Predator, which turns a smartphone into a remote eavesdropping device and lets the attacker siphon off data.

Intellexa was established by former Israeli Defense Force intelligence officer Tal Dilian, who was previously associated with NSO Group, creator of the notorious spyware Pegasus.

Ukrainian officials say a Russian attack on a village cafe killed 48 people

Ukrainian officials say a Russian attack on a village in the northeast of the country killed 48 people and injured at least six more.

Presidential chief of staff Andrii Yermak and Kharkiv Gov. Oleh Syniehubov say Russian forces shelled a shop and a cafe in the village of Hroza, in the Kharkiv region, around 1 p.m.

A 6-year-old boy was among those killed in the attack, Syniehubov says, and one child was also among the wounded.

Turkey’s energy minister says he’ll visit Israel soon for talks on gas delivery

Turkish Energy Minister Alparslan Bayraktar talks during the ADIPEC, Oil and Energy exhibition and conference in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday Oct. 2, 2023. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)
Turkish Energy Minister Alparslan Bayraktar talks during the ADIPEC, Oil and Energy exhibition and conference in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday Oct. 2, 2023. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Turkey’s Energy Minister Alparslan Bayraktar says that he will visit Israel “in the next couple of weeks,” and that the focus will be on the delivery of Israeli natural gas to Turkey.

Speaking to Turkey’s NTFV, Bayraktar says that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan agreed during their September meeting in New York that he would negotiate the delivery of gas face-to-face with Energy Minister Israel Katz “during a trip to Israel in November which we are planning as well as meeting companies [in Israel] working in that field.”

“We are talking about more comprehensive energy cooperation but the delivery of Israeli gas to Turkey and to Europe via Turkey is the ‘flagship’ or among the top priorities,” he says.

“We are talking about part of the gas absolutely [staying] in Turkey and part of it going to Europe to ensure European supply security,” he explains, saying that preparations have already been made to make the project a reality.

Poland vows to oppose EU migrant deal

Poland's Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki leaves after an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels, on March 24, 2023. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys, Pool)
Poland's Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki leaves after an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels, on March 24, 2023. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys, Pool)

Poland’s right-wing prime minister brands an EU migration reform package a diktat from Brussels and Berlin and pledges a “firm veto.”

European Union member states on Wednesday agreed to the final part of an overhaul for rules on how they handle asylum seekers and irregular migrants.

The issue is set to figure prominently at two days of summits involving EU leaders in the Spanish city of Granada starting today.

Once implemented, the new Pact on Migration and Asylum would seek to relieve the pressure on so-called frontline countries such as Italy and Greece by relocating some arrivals to other EU states.

Those countries opposed to hosting asylum-seekers would be required to pay the ones that do take migrants in.

“A very clear question should be asked: why should we agree to a diktat from Brussels, a diktat from Berlin?” Mateusz Morawiecki says in a statement before leaving for Spain.

“I’m going to Granada for the summit of the European Council to put a firm veto,” Morawiecki says

Lawyer for Israelis accused of Cyprus rape says waiting for key probe materials

File: Yiannis Habaris, the lawyer for three of five Israelis who are accused of raping a British woman, speaks on his cellphone outside the Famagusta District Courthouse in Paralimni, Cyprus, on Tuesday, September 12, 2023. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias, File)
File: Yiannis Habaris, the lawyer for three of five Israelis who are accused of raping a British woman, speaks on his cellphone outside the Famagusta District Courthouse in Paralimni, Cyprus, on Tuesday, September 12, 2023. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias, File)

Five Israelis accused of gang-raping a British woman in a Cyprus hotel room won’t plead to charges including rape, sexual assault and abduction until prosecutors hand over key material including DNA tests, fingerprints and eyewitness testimony, a lawyer says.

Yannis Habaris, a lawyer representing three of the five Israeli nationals, tells The Associated Press that the judge adjourned the trial until October 16 to give the prosecution enough time to give the material to defense lawyers.

Habaris says DNA results, which prosecutors told the court would be ready within 24 hours, are essential in counseling his clients on the best course of action that should be taken for their defense.

He says without that material, which also includes testimony from one witness who was inside the hotel room at the time of the alleged rape, he would not be in a “position to counsel his clients regarding their plea.”

The Israelis will remain in custody in a Paralimni detention center until their next court appearance. Two of the suspects have a new attorney since their original defense counsel is no longer representing them. Many relatives of the suspects, including parents and uncles, were present in the courtroom.

Musk’s X strips headlines from news links

Elon Musk’s social media platform X has stripped headlines from news articles shared by users, in a move likely to further worsen relations with media groups.

The tycoon has long railed against the “legacy media” and claims X, formerly Twitter, is a better source of information.

However, he said the latest change was for “aesthetic” reasons — news and other links now appear only as pictures with no accompanying text.

The changes appear to have been introduced gradually this week.

Instead of seeing a headline along with a picture, users now see only a picture with a small watermark.

Some users have commented that it is now difficult to distinguish between news and other kinds of information, which is likely to raise questions about the trustworthiness of the site.

 

Norwegian writer Jon Fosse wins the Nobel Prize in literature

Jon Fosse, author of shortlisted novel 'A New Name: Septology VI-VII,' poses ahead of the 2022 International Booker Prize ceremony in London, May 26, 2022. (AP Photo/David Cliff, File)
Jon Fosse, author of shortlisted novel 'A New Name: Septology VI-VII,' poses ahead of the 2022 International Booker Prize ceremony in London, May 26, 2022. (AP Photo/David Cliff, File)

Norwegian writer Jon Fosse wins the Nobel Prize in literature, for plays and prose that “give voice to the unsayable,” according to the Swedish Academy.

One of his country’s most-performed dramatists, Fosse, 64, has written some 40 plays as well as novels, short stories, children’s books, poetry and essays.

Anders Olsson, chairman of the Nobel literature committee, says Fosse’s work is rooted “in the language and nature of his Norwegian background.”

Fosse is the fourth Norwegian writer to get the Nobel. Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson got it in 1903, Knut Hamsun was awarded it in 1920 and Sigrid Undset in 1928.

His work “A New Name: Septology VI-VII” — described by Olsson as Fosse’s “magnum opus” — was a finalist for the International Booker Prize in 2022.

September was so much warmer than average scientists call it ‘mind-blowing’

File: A woman holds an umbrella to protect herself from the sun, in Paris, September 6, 2023. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
File: A woman holds an umbrella to protect herself from the sun, in Paris, September 6, 2023. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

After a summer of record-smashing heat, warming somehow got even worse in September as Earth set a new mark for how far above normal temperatures were, the European climate agency reports.

Last month’s average temperature was 0.93 degrees Celsius (1.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above the 1991-2020 average for September. That’s the warmest margin above average for a month in 83 years of records kept by the European Space Agency’s Copernicus Climate Change Service.

“It’s just mind-blowing really,” says Copernicus Director Carlo Buontempo. “Never seen anything like that in any month in our records.”

While July and August had hotter raw temperatures because they are warmer months on the calendar, September had what scientists call the biggest anomaly, or departure from normal. Temperature anomalies are crucial pieces of data in a warming world.

“This is not a fancy weather statistic,” Imperial College of London climate scientist Friederike Otto says in an email. “It’s a death sentence for people and ecosystems. It destroys assets, infrastructure, harvest.”

Copernicus calculates that the average temperature for September was 16.38 degrees Celsius (61.48 degrees Fahrenheit), which broke the old record set in September 2020 by a whopping half-degree Celsius (0.9 degrees Fahrenheit). That’s a huge margin in climate records.

German officials raid properties belonging to Russian national targeted by sanctions

A special unit of police and customs officials have raided several properties of a Russian national in the southern state of Bavaria, officials say.

The unidentified Russian is subject to sanctions and asset freezes by the European Union, German customs officials say.

The European Union, the United States and other Western nations have imposed sanctions against Russia in response to Moscow’s war against Ukraine. These include travel bans and asset freezes of a number of Russian government members and certain Russian businesspeople.

Five Israelis lightly-to-moderately hurt in car accident in Sinai

Five Israelis have been lightly-to-moderately injured in a car accident in the Sinai Peninsula, near the Taba border crossing.

They were treated by local medical authorities and then transferred to Israel for care.

Eritrean women protest in Tel Aviv against police failure to halt violence

Members of the Eritrean community in Israel protest outside police headquarters in south Tel Aviv, October 5, 2023. (Avshalom Sassoni/Flash90)
Members of the Eritrean community in Israel protest outside police headquarters in south Tel Aviv, October 5, 2023. (Avshalom Sassoni/Flash90)

Hundreds of Eritrean women protested in Tel Aviv earlier against the police’s failure to halt repeated violent clashes between supporters and opponents of the regime in Asmara.

The women rallied near the police’s district headquarters in the city’s south. They demanded law enforcement ensure their safety in the wake of recent violent incidents.

The protest was organized by opponents of the authoritarian regime, with many signs blasting and demanding the closure of the “terrorist embassy” in the city, which was at the center of unprecedented riots last month that injured over 100 people.

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