The Israeli army on Wednesday offered its first reaction to the Russian sale of an advanced air defense system to Iran, characterizing the S-300 missile system as an obstacle, but one that can be overcome.

“The S-300 is a challenge,” Brig. Gen. Lihu HaCohen, the commander of the Nevatim Air Base, told a group of reporters. “The Air Force is preparing for an array of scenarios, including with this system. In the event that it will need to provide a response, the Air Force will know how to respond to the challenge.”

Russia has promised the system to three states in the region – Iran, Syria and Egypt. It is unclear what model S-300 is being offered, but were it to be placed in Syria, on Israel’s border, it would represent a constant threat to aircraft in the center of the country.

IAF veterans suggested earlier this week that the arrival of the system in Iran would complicate any potential Israeli air strike against the Islamic Republic’s nuclear facilities, but not seal the skies.

A Russian air-defense missile system Antey 2500, or S-300 VM, is on display at the opening of the MAKS Air Show in Zhukovsky outside Moscow, August 27, 2013 (photo credit: AP/Ivan Sekretarev, File)

A Russian air defense missile system Antey 2500, or S-300 VM, is on display at the opening of the MAKS Air Show in Zhukovsky outside Moscow, August 27, 2013 (photo credit: AP/Ivan Sekretarev, File)

“If the Israeli Air Force had the ability to act against Iran’s nuclear facilities before the S-300, then it will have it afterward, too,” said retired IAF general Asaf Agmon, head of the Fischer Institute for Air and Space Strategic Studies.

The acquisition, however, would force Israel to devote vast amounts of electronic warfare capacity against such a system and to invest in weapons that could combat it, further complicating any strike against Iran and, potentially, raising the toll in human life if such a strike were to be ordered.

Agmon said Iranian air defense teams have been training on the Russian system since the deal was initially made in 2007 and that, if it is delivered to Iran, it would take only weeks for it to be made operational.

Another concern, he said, is that once such a system has been passed on to Iran, it might be transferred to Syrian President Bashar Assad’s forces or those of Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah in Lebanon.

HaCohen spoke as the IAF welcomed the arrival of Lockheed Martin’s F-35 demo flight simulator in Nevatim Air Base. The first pair of the next-generation jets are set to arrive in Israel in December 2016.

Israel plans to purchase two squadrons of 25 jets each, but has thus far ordered only 33, with the Ministerial Committee on Defense Procurement nixing the Defense Ministry’s request for the full 50 airplanes.

“The government doesn’t have to be a rubber stamp for the defense establishment,” Strategic and Intelligence Affairs Minister Yuval Steinitz said in February.

Steve Over, Director, F-35 International Business Development, said that the F-35 is equipped to handle advanced air defense systems.

“When developing the program, we took in consideration future threats such as the S-300 and developed technologies to deal with them,” he said in an email, noting the aircraft’s stealth and its
specially developed sensors, which are designed to pick up enemy radar.