Morsi’s rule said threatened by impending protests
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Morsi’s rule said threatened by impending protests

Military says it will defend June 30 demonstrators from regime violence; government hopes event ‘will pass quietly’

Aaron Kalman is a former writer and breaking news editor for the Times of Israel

An illustrative photo of Egyptian protesters chanting anti Muslim Brotherhood slogans outside the presidential palace, in Cairo, Egypt, in December 2012. (photo credit: AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)
An illustrative photo of Egyptian protesters chanting anti Muslim Brotherhood slogans outside the presidential palace, in Cairo, Egypt, in December 2012. (photo credit: AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)

Mohammed Morsi’s rule in Egypt may end only one year after it began, as the civilian population was preparing to take to the streets en masse to protest against the Islamist president, Egyptian military sources said Thursday.

Officials in Egypt’s ruling party believe the protests — nicknamed the June 30 revolution — could mark the end of the Muslim Brotherhood’s rule, in a turnabout reminiscent of the one in which former president Hosni Mubarak was dethroned, Ma’an reported.

The unnamed sources told the Palestinian news agency that there was much confusion and fear ahead of the planned demonstrations, after Egyptian Chief of Staff Sedki Sobhi announced the military would prevent the regime from violently dispersing the protesters. “The Egyptian army will be in the streets” if there are millions of people to protect, one source was quoted as saying.

Egypt’s military has warned the Muslim Brotherhood not to allow armed security personnel to get involved in the demonstrations or try to disperse them, the source said, because “the army will violently intervene.”

Ahmed Aref, a spokesman for the Muslim Brotherhood, “denounced repeatedly circulated rumors about the Brotherhood regarding the June 30 demonstrations,” the Egyptian daily Ahram reported.

“We hope 30 June will pass quietly, with responsible, balanced security arrangements that will uphold law and order in the street,” Aref was quoted as saying. “So far, the Brotherhood has not taken a decision regarding that day; but state apparatuses should address any violence, in a reserved, peaceful way.”

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