European court rejects PETA appeal over ‘Holocaust’ ads
search

European court rejects PETA appeal over ‘Holocaust’ ads

Ban on German billboards that likened animals to genocide victims was not a violation of free speech, judges rule

BERLIN (JTA) — Germany can bar the animal rights group PETA from comparing the fate of animals today with that of Holocaust victims, Europe’s highest court for human rights ruled.

The European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg on Thursday upheld a 2009 German Supreme Court ruling that banned People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals from using photos of concentration camp inmates and other images of the Nazi genocide alongside photos of abused animals in a campaign called Holocaust on your Plate. PETA has three months to appeal the ruling, according to German news reports.

The Central Council of Jews in Germany, which had fought the PETA campaign since it was launched here in 2004, welcomed the ruling.

“The judges were correct in determining that the [German] ban did not infringe on freedom of expression, but that rather the poster campaign trivialized the Holocaust in an irresponsible manner,” Dieter Graumann, the head of the council, said in a statement Thursday.

The German PETA campaign included eight large panels showing black-and-white images of emaciated concentration camp inmates next to color photos of chickens, turkeys and other animals fattened for slaughter. One poster bore the slogan, in German, “Final Humiliation,” and another read “For animals, all people are Nazis.”

A photo of children in a concentration camp stood next to one of piglets in a stall. Under them was the caption “Child Butcher.” According to reports, the PETA campaign in Germany was even more explicit than the US ad campaign that was launched in 2003.

The Central Council sued PETA in 2004. The late Paul Spiegel, then the head of the council, called the ad campaign “the most disgusting abuse of the memory of the Holocaust in recent years.” The project also was condemned in the United States by the Anti-Defamation League and other groups.

PETA lost and appealed to Germany’s Supreme Court, which ruled against it in 2009, noting that the comparison of human to animal suffering could prove extremely hurtful to Jews.

Join us!
A message from the Editor of Times of Israel
David Horovitz

The Times of Israel covers one of the most complicated, and contentious, parts of the world. Determined to keep readers fully informed and enable them to form and flesh out their own opinions, The Times of Israel has gradually established itself as the leading source of independent and fair-minded journalism on Israel, the region and the Jewish world.

We've achieved this by investing ever-greater resources in our journalism while keeping all of the content on our site free.

Unlike many other news sites, we have not put up a paywall. But we would like to invite readers who can afford to do so, and for whom The Times of Israel has become important, to help support our journalism by joining The Times of Israel Community. Join now and for as little as $6 a month you can both help ensure our ongoing investment in quality journalism, and enjoy special status and benefits as a Times of Israel Community member.

Become a member of The Times of Israel Community
read more:
comments