After attack, Netanyahu vows never to uproot any settlers
search

After attack, Netanyahu vows never to uproot any settlers

PM inaugurates new interchange in the central West Bank, says Israel will continue to connect settlements to Israel

Jacob Magid is the settlements correspondent for The Times of Israel.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (3rd from right) cuts the ribbon at an inaugural ceremony of a new interchange at the central West Bank settlement of Adam on December 11, 2018. (Jacob Magid/Times of Israel)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (3rd from right) cuts the ribbon at an inaugural ceremony of a new interchange at the central West Bank settlement of Adam on December 11, 2018. (Jacob Magid/Times of Israel)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vowed Tuesday to continue to develop Israeli settlements in response to Palestinian terror, such as the drive-by shooting that took place outside Ofra earlier this week.

Speaking at an inaugural ceremony for a new interchange outside the Adam settlement in the central West Bank, Netanyahu said, “Our enemies want to uproot us from here, but… as long as I am the prime minister of Israel, not a single Jew will be uprooted from his home.

“Not only will Jews not be uprooted from their homes, but we will build and add to them,” he added.

Throughout Netanyahu’s tenure, a number of illegal Israeli homes and outposts were evacuated, most recently 15 homes in Netiv Ha’avot last June, preceded by nine homes in the Ofra settlement and the 42 homes of Amona during 2017.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks at the inaugural ceremony of a new interchange at the central West Bank settlement of Adam on December 11, 2018. (Jacob Magid/Times of Israel)

Nonetheless, the prime minister said that Israel would prove that the desire of its enemies to uproot Jewish presence in the West Bank “will be met by an impenetrable wall.

“That is why we are here today,” Netanyahu continued, highlighting the new interchange.

The NIS 60 million ($16 million) transportation project saw the construction of an underground tunnel below the Adam Interchange, which is designed to decrease congestion for commuters traveling between central West Bank settlements and Jerusalem.

Dubbed the “Adam Divider,” the interchange will separate Palestinian traffic going to and from Qaladiya from Israeli commuters to and from Jerusalem.

“These are not tunnels of terror like those of Hamas and Hezbollah… but rather tunnels of life,” Netanyahu said.

He vowed to continue connecting the Israeli communities beyond the Green Line to Israel proper through various construction projects.

“The greatest dramas in the history of our people and humanity occurred here in this place, and therefore we will attach our past to our future,” he said.

Netanyahu appeared relaxed, wearing a pair of baggy black jeans, leaning onto the podium and quizzing the roughly 200 guests on their knowledge of various historical sites beyond the Green Line.

The prime minister was welcomed warmly at the ceremony by a crowd that included Transportation Minister Israel Katz, Jerusalem Mayor Moshe Lion and various West Bank municipal council chairs.

Transportation Minister Israel Katz speaks at the inaugural ceremony of a new interchange at the central West Bank settlement of Adam on December 11, 2018. (Jacob Magid/Times of Israel)

Katz, who was also honored for his efforts in advancing the project, told the crowd that Israel would double the number of settlers by the year 2030.

There are currently roughly 450,000 Israelis living in the West Bank.

“The Transportation Ministry invests millions of shekels int the development of roads in Judea and Samaria (West Bank) that guarantee both safety and security for the residents of the area,” said the transportation minister.

Binyamin Regional Council Chairman Yisrael Gantz thanked Netanyahu and Katz for their “statement that Judea and Samaria is part and parcel of Israel.”

He also asked the politicians to focus their next project on improving the West Bank’s main north-south artery, Route 60, which is frequently congested with traffic throughout its narrow, two-lane roads.

read more:
comments
more less