Istanbul death toll rises to 41 as Turkey hunts for perpetrators
search

Istanbul death toll rises to 41 as Turkey hunts for perpetrators

At least 13 foreigners among those killed in triple suicide bombings at Ataturk airport; 239 hurt, with 130 still hospitalized

The daughter (center) of Siddik Turgan, who died in the June 28, 2016 Ataturk airport attack that killed 41 people, reacts as her father's coffin is carried nearby during his funeral ceremony on June 29, 2016 in Istanbul. (AFP PHOTO/BULENT KILIC)
The daughter (center) of Siddik Turgan, who died in the June 28, 2016 Ataturk airport attack that killed 41 people, reacts as her father's coffin is carried nearby during his funeral ceremony on June 29, 2016 in Istanbul. (AFP PHOTO/BULENT KILIC)

ISTANBUL — A triple suicide bombing at Istanbul’s international airport left 41 people dead, 13 of them foreign nationals, and 239 wounded, the city governor said in a statement.

The governor’s office said 109 of the 239 wounded were discharged from hospital.

It said 13 of the dead were foreigners. One of the fatalities has been confirmed as a Palestinian.

A Turkish official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said five of the dead were from Saudi Arabia, two were from Iraq, and one from Tunisia, Uzbekistan, China, Iran, Ukraine and Jordan.

No one has claimed Tuesday’s attack yet but Turkish authorities said they suspect Islamic State jihadists.

Forensic experts wait outside a building close to Istanbul's airport a day after a triple suicide bombing and gun attack at the international airport, June 29, 2016. (AFP/OZAN KOSE)
Forensic experts wait outside a building close to Istanbul’s airport a day after a triple suicide bombing and gun attack at the international airport, June 29, 2016. (AFP/OZAN KOSE)

Turkey remains on high security alert after a series of attacks on its soil blamed not only on the IS group but also Kurdish militants.

IS has never claimed an attack in Turkey. But authorities have blamed the group for several attacks, including a blast in Ankara in October 2015 that left over 100 people dead and an attack on Istanbul’s busy tourist district Istiklal Street which killed three Israelis and an Iranian in March 2016.

Witnesses described scenes of terror and panic on Tuesday evening as the attackers began shooting indiscriminately and then blew themselves up at the entrance to Ataturk airport, one of Europe’s busiest hubs.

The assault, at the start of Turkey’s crucial summer tourist season, was the latest in a wave of attacks in Istanbul and the capital Ankara over the past year, putting the country on high alert.

Passengers leave Ataturk airport in Istanbul on June 28, 2016 after two explosions followed by gunfire hit Turkey's biggest airport, killing at least 28 people and injuring 20. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE / Turkey OUT
Passengers leave Ataturk airport in Istanbul on June 28, 2016 after two explosions followed by gunfire hit Turkey’s biggest airport, killing at least 28 people and injuring 20. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE / Turkey OUT

 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called for an international “joint fight” against terror, as Western allies including the United States condemned the “heinous” attack.

Yildirim said the three suicide bombers had arrived at the airport in a taxi and opened fire at the entrance to the international terminal before detonating their explosives.

Security camera footage widely circulated on social media appeared to capture two of the blasts. In one clip a huge ball of flame erupts at an entrance to the terminal building, scattering terrified passengers.

Another video shows a black-clad attacker running inside the building before collapsing to the ground — apparently felled by a police bullet — and blowing himself up.

The attack came just as Turkey, which had found itself increasingly friendless on the international stage, begins rebuilding relations with Israel and Russia.

It follows coordinated IS suicide bombings at Brussels airport and a city metro station in March that left 32 people dead.

This picture obtained from the Ilhas News Agency shows ambulances and police setting up a perimeter, next to people lying on the ground (R), after two explosions followed by gunfire hit the Turkey's biggest airport of Ataturk in Istanbul, on June 28, 2016. (AFP / ILHAS NEWS AGENCY)
This picture obtained from the Ilhas News Agency shows ambulances and police setting up a perimeter, next to people lying on the ground (R), after two explosions followed by gunfire hit the Turkey’s biggest airport of Ataturk in Istanbul, on June 28, 2016. (AFP / ILHAS NEWS AGENCY)

An AFP photographer saw bodies covered with sheets at the terminal, where bullet holes peppered the windows and shattered glass was strewn on the floor, along with abandoned luggage.

Otfah Mohamed Abdullah was checking her luggage in when she saw one of the attackers pull out a hidden gun.

“He’s shooting up, two times, and he’s beginning to shoot people like that, like he was walking like a prophet,” she told AFPTV.

“Everybody started running in different directions when the shooting started. I hid under the counter where I was standing and a couple of the ground staff did the same,” South African university administrator Judy Favish told eNCA television in her home country.

Favish said she and other travelers were ushered to the basement before emerging about two hours later.

“We walked through the airport and saw debris and blood. It was just chaos. It was horrible.”

Analyst Soner Cagaptay, director of the Turkish Research Program at The Washington Institute, described it as a “symbolic attack against the heart of Turkey.”

“If this Islamic State is indeed behind this attack, this would be a declaration of war. Turkey’s vengeance will come down like rain from hell on the Islamic State.”

Workers assess damage at the explosions and attacks site in Ataturk airport's international arrivals terminal on June 29, 2016, a day after a suicide bombing and gun attack targeted Istanbul's airport, killing at least 36 people. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE
Workers assess damage at the explosions and attacks site in Ataturk airport’s international arrivals terminal on June 29, 2016, a day after a suicide bombing and gun attack targeted Istanbul’s airport, killing at least 36 people. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE

The attack prompted the suspension of all flights at the airport, but operations were resuming on Wednesday with some delays.

There was chaos at the nearest hospital in Istanbul’s Bakirkoy district, which was inundated with relatives desperate for news of loved ones.

Brussels airport, the scene of suicide bombings just months ago, tweeted condolences, saying: “Our thoughts are with the victims of the attacks at @istanbulairport.”

The US and French consulates warned people to stay away from the area.

Erdogan met his prime minister and military chief after news of the carnage broke.

“We urge the world, especially Western countries, to take a firm stand against terrorism,” Erdogan said in a statement.

“Despite paying a heavy price, Turkey has the power, determination and capacity to continue the fight against terrorism until the end.”

Istanbul, a major tourist hub that is home to some 15 million people, has suffered a series of attacks in the past year, including a bombing in the heart of the tourist district that killed a dozen German visitors and was blamed on IS.

Two months later, three Israelis and an Iranian were killed in a bomb attack on the city’s main Istiklal shopping street, also blamed on IS.

A blast on the tarmac at Istanbul’s other international airport, Sabiha Gokcen, killed a cleaner in December.

Turkey has been hit by at least five attacks blamed on IS jihadists, including a blast in Ankara in October 2015 that left over 100 dead, the worst in the country’s modern history.

The Kurdistan Freedom Falcons (TAK) — seen as a splinter group of the rebel Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) — also claimed a car bombing in Istanbul in June that killed 11, and warned foreign tourists they would not be safe in Turkey.

It said its action was to avenge a sustained offensive against the outlawed PKK in southeastern Turkey following the collapse of a ceasefire last year.

Hundreds of members of the Turkish security forces have since been killed in PKK attacks.

read more:
comments