Anthony Weiner to leave prison 3 months early for good conduct
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Anthony Weiner to leave prison 3 months early for good conduct

Former New York congressman will be released after serving 18 months for transferring obscene material to a 15-year-old

Anthony Weiner leaves federal court in New York after pleading guilty to a charge of sending sexual material to a minor, May 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Anthony Weiner leaves federal court in New York after pleading guilty to a charge of sending sexual material to a minor, May 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Former New York congressman Anthony Weiner, who was sentenced to 21 months in federal prison for sexting with a 15-year-old girl, will be released three months early for “good conduct.”

Weiner reported to FMC Devens in Massachusetts — one of the few federal prisons with a residential treatment for sex offenders —  last Nov. 6, 2017. His new release date is now set for May 14, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons website.

Admitting “I have a sickness, but I do not have an excuse,” Weiner pleaded guilty in May to transferring obscene material to a minor, punishable by up to 10 years in prison, for illicit contact with a North Carolina teenager.

Prosecutors said he sent her porn and got her to take her clothes off and touch herself on Skype.

Anthony Weiner and Huma Abedin at a news conference in New York City at which Weiner acknowledged that he engaged in lewd online conversations with a woman after his resignation from Congress, July 23, 2013. (John Moore/Getty Images via JTA)

He must also register as a sex offender for life for his inappropriate conversations with the teen.

The FBI was investigating Weiner’s contact with the high school student when it came across emails on his laptop between Abedin and Clinton, prompting then-FBI Director James Comey to announce in late October 2016 that he was reopening the probe of Clinton’s use of a private computer server.

Two days before Election Day, the FBI announced there was nothing new in the emails. But Clinton has blamed Comey’s handling of the episode more than any other factor for her loss to Donald Trump. In an NBC interview, she called the FBI director’s intervention “the determining factor” in her defeat.

Weiner’s troubles date back to 2011, when the Jewish lawmaker resigned from Congress after tweeting an explicit photo. Weiner’s behavior in all its lurid detail — including his online alias “Carlos Danger” and a selfie of his bulging underwear — turned him and his last name into an irresistible punchline for late-night comics and mortified his wife again and again.

He has been involved in multiple sexting scandals, and his wife, Huma Abedin, a longtime Clinton aide, is divorcing him.

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