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Survey shows Likud soaring to 36 seats, Otzma Yehudit out

Knesset Channel poll suggests voters may be swinging rightward after Netanyahu’s promise to apply sovereignty in Jordan Valley

Likud party supporters cheer at the party's campaign headquarters after polls close in Knesset elections, in Tel Aviv, in the early hours of April 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
Likud party supporters cheer at the party's campaign headquarters after polls close in Knesset elections, in Tel Aviv, in the early hours of April 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

A poll published by the Knesset Channel on Thursday showed Likud surging to 36 seats and far-right Otzma Yehudit left out by the curb.

According to the PanelsPolitics online survey, a right wing-religious bloc would snag 60 seats without Yisrael Beytenu, one shy of a ruling coalition.

The survey showed Blue and White with 32 seats, followed by the Arab Joint List with 10 and everybody else in single digits.

Most polls in recent days have shown Likud and Blue and White neck and neck at around 31-32, and Kahanist Otzma Yehudit just squeezing in with four seats.

The latest poll is much more favorable to the right, with Labor-Gesher on the left only just making it in, and the further-left Democratic Camp not doing much better at just five seats.

Rightist Yamina gets nine, as does Yisrael Beytenu. Haredi parties United Torah Judaism and Shas get eight and seven, respectively.

The poll also asked Israelis who they believe was a better fit for the prime minister’s post. Netanyahu won a plurality of respondents with 39 percent, followed by Gantz at 29%.

Asked what sort of coalition they hoped to see formed after the election, 38% said they wanted a right wing-Haredi coalition led by Netanyahu’s Likud, 21% preferred a unity government of Likud, Blue and White and Yisrael Beytenu, and just 14% preferred a center-left coalition led by Blue and White and including left-wing and Arab factions.

The new figures may show a rightward turn by voters following Netanyahu’s announcement on Tuesday that he would apply Israeli sovereignty to much of the Jordan Valley immediately after his reelection.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meeting schoolkids in the West Bank settlement of Elkana on the first day of school, September 1, 2019. (Courtesy)

But a plurality of respondents, 40%, said in the Knesset Channel poll they didn’t believe Netanyahu’s promise. Just 31% believed him.

The online poll asked 539 respondents that are a representative sample of Israel’s adult population, with a margin of error of 4.4%.

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