Palestinian terror group Hamas said Wednesday night that the man who died earlier in the evening of wounds sustained in Monday’s Jerusalem bus bombing was the terrorist who placed the explosive device in the vehicle.

The terror group identified him as a 19-year-old Palestinian from al-Ayda refugee camp outside of Bethlehem. His name was still barred from publication on Wednesday evening amid the ongoing Israeli investigation of the attack.

The Hamas announcement appeared to fall short of a full claim of responsibility for the attack, in which 21 people were injured.

Jerusalem’s Shaare Zedek hospital confirmed earlier Wednesday that a man who was seriously injured in the Jerusalem bus bombing on Monday had died of his injuries. Police were said to still be investigating whether he was the bomber in the terror attack.

In an undated photograph, the man named by Hamas as the person responsible for the April 18 bus bombing in Jerusalem, who died of wounds sustained in the terror attack on April 20, 2016. (Courtesy)

In an undated photograph, the man named by Hamas as the person responsible for the April 18 bus bombing in Jerusalem, who died of wounds sustained in the terror attack on April 20, 2016. (Courtesy)

A teenage girl was seriously hurt and six others were moderately injured in the blast on the number 12 bus in the Talpiot neighborhood of the capital, police and paramedics said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack by any terrorist groups or individuals. Hamas welcomed the attack on Monday.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld on Tuesday confirmed officers were seeking to question the wounded, and did not rule out the possibility of potential suspects among them.

Firefighters look on as two buses burn in Jerusalem. Police launched an investigation into the incident, April 18, 2016. (Israel Police)

Firefighters look on as two buses burn in Jerusalem. Police launched an investigation into the incident, April 18, 2016. (Israel Police)

“The investigation is looking to see how the explosive device was placed on the bus,” Rosenfeld said.

Police imposed a gag order on further details of the investigation and any suspects.

The terror attack broke weeks of relative calm in the city after a six-month wave of Palestinian stabbings, shootings and vehicular attacks seemed to be subsiding, and raised fears of a return to a type of violence not seen in Jerusalem for years.

Bus bombings were common during the Second Intifada, or uprising, in the early 2000s, but Monday’s attack was the first bomb targeting a bus in Jerusalem since 2011, when a British tourist was killed by a bomb planted next to a bus stop.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday night promised to “find whoever prepared this explosive device.”

“We’ll settle the score with these terrorists,” he said.

Judah Ari Gross and AFP contributed to this report.