Alleged Jewish extremists banned from West Bank, Jerusalem
search

Alleged Jewish extremists banned from West Bank, Jerusalem

Security services issue administrative restraining orders to 10 right-wing activists in wake of deadly firebombing

Tamar Pileggi is a breaking news editor at The Times of Israel.

FILE: A masked Jewish settler swings a slingshot as he stands near the West Bank Jewish settlement of Yitzhar, on May 19, 2013. (Mendy Hechtman/Flash90)
FILE: A masked Jewish settler swings a slingshot as he stands near the West Bank Jewish settlement of Yitzhar, on May 19, 2013. (Mendy Hechtman/Flash90)

Israeli security services issued restraining orders to at least seven right-wing Jewish activists overnight Saturday, bringing the total number of alleged extremists temporarily banned from entering the West Bank or Jerusalem in recent days to 10.

The wave of restraining orders came as authorities attempted to crack down on Jewish extremists in the wake of the July killing of Sa’ad Dawabsha and his 18-month-old son, Ali, in a firebombing attack on their home in the Palestinian village of Duma in the West Bank. The attack, coupled with a fatal stabbing spree by an extremist Jew at Jerusalem’s gay pride parade a day earlier, sparked an international and domestic outcry over Israel’s failure to come to grips with violence by Jewish terrorists and extremists.

In a statement, the Shin Bet said the measures were taken against individuals in the agency’s “uncompromising effort to dismantle the terrorist infrastructure that carried out the attacks, and prevent additional activity that endangers public security.”

Shin Bet and police early Sunday morning issued restraining orders to two students enrolled at the Od Yosef Chai yeshiva in the hardline West Bank settlement of Yitzhar. The students were banned from the West Bank for six months and ordered to remain under house arrest at night. In addition, one of the students was banned from Jerusalem and was told to refrain from making contact with a number of his friends.

Police also issued issued restraining orders barring two minors from entering Jerusalem for a six-month period. Both teens, one from Ma’ale Adumim and one from central Israel, were ordered to remain under house arrest at night. A third minor from the settlement of Amona, north of Jerusalem, was sentenced to full house arrest for the next six months.

Similar orders were distributed by police to right-wing activists in the Hebron-area settlement of Kiryat Arba, as well the northern West Bank outposts of Givat Habaladim and Geulat Zion.

The Shin Bet statement described the illegal outpost of Givat Habaladim as a hotbed of extremist activity, and said a number of known attackers had fled there in the past.

Right-wing activist and attorney Itamar Ben Gvir, who is representing a number of the detained, said his clients intend to appeal the orders.

“The defense minister is behaving like a bull in a china shop. His actions send the message to young people that there is no democratic process and encourages them to break the law since no indictment was given or due process was followed,” Ben Gvir said, according to the Hebrew-language news site NRG.

Meir Ettinger, the head of a Jewish extremist group, stands at the Israeli justice court in Nazareth Illit on August 4, 2015, a day after his arrest (AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ)
Meir Ettinger, the head of a Jewish extremist group, stands at the Israeli justice court in Nazareth Illit on August 4, 2015, a day after his arrest (AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ)

Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon approved the use of detention without charges — known as administrative detention — and other means in an effort to track down the killers of the Dawabshas earlier this month.

Meir Ettinger, the 23-year-old grandson of assassinated extremist rabbi Meir Kahane, founder of the outlawed anti-Arab Kach organization, was arrested earlier this month in connection with alleged extremist activity. Ya’alon approved the order authorizing for Ettinger to be held in administrative detention.

Ya’alon said the use of administrative detention for a number of Jewish terror suspects has proved effective in preventing additional violence against Arabs by hardline Jews.

read more:
comments