Corbyn: UK gov’t heightening Gulf tensions by blaming Iran for tanker attacks
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Corbyn: UK gov’t heightening Gulf tensions by blaming Iran for tanker attacks

Labour leader says Britain should work to lower the flames in the region, ‘not fuel a military escalation that began with US withdrawal’ from the nuclear deal

UK Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his house in north London on June 12, 2019. (Isabel Infantes/AFP)
UK Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his house in north London on June 12, 2019. (Isabel Infantes/AFP)

UK Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn accused the British government of heightening the possibility of a military conflict in the Persian Gulf, after the country’s foreign minister said Iran was culpable for this week’s attack on a pair of oil tankers.

“Britain should act to ease tensions in the Gulf, not fuel a military escalation that began with US withdrawal from the Iran nuclear agreement,” Corbyn tweeted Friday.

“Without credible evidence about the tanker attacks, the government’s rhetoric will only increase the threat of war,” he added.

The comments by Corbyn, a far-left lawmaker who previously has appeared on a television network connected to the state-owned Iranian broadcasting company, came after British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said that an independent assessment had concluded that Iran was “almost certainly” responsible for the latest Gulf tanker attacks.

Britain’s Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt leaves 10 Downing Street in London on June 11, 2019. (Isabel Infantes/AFP)

“Our own assessment leads us to conclude that responsibility for the attacks almost certainly lies with Iran. These latest attacks build on a pattern of destabilizing Iranian behavior and pose a serious danger to the region,” Hunt said in a statement.

The Foreign Office statement pinned the blame for Thursday’s attack on the Islamic Revolutionary Guard — a vast and powerful branch of the Iranian military.

“No other state or non-state actor could plausibly have been responsible,” the Foreign Office statement said.

Hunt called on Iran to “cease all forms of destabilizing activity” and said Britain was working with other countries to try to find a diplomatic solution to the escalating standoff between Tehran and Washington.

The US military on Friday released a video it said shows Iran’s Revolutionary Guards removing an unexploded limpet mine from one of the oil tankers targeted near the Strait of Hormuz, suggesting the Islamic republic sought to remove evidence of its involvement from the scene.

Iran denies being involved, accusing the US instead of waging an “Iranophobic campaign” against it.

This June 13, 2019, image released by the US military’s Central Command, shows damage and a suspected mine on the Kokuka Courageous in the Gulf of Oman near the coast of Iran. (U.S. Central Command via AP)

While Iran has denied being involved in the attack, Tehran previously used mines against oil tankers in 1987 and 1988 in the “Tanker War,” when the US Navy escorted ships through the region.

The black-and-white footage, as well as still photographs released by the US military’s Central Command on Friday, appeared to show the limpet mine on the Kokuka Courageous.

The suspected attacks occurred at dawn Thursday about 40 kilometers (25 miles) off the southern coast of Iran. The Front Altair, loaded with the flammable hydrocarbon mixture naphtha from the United Arab Emirates, radioed for help as it caught fire. A short time later, the Kokuka Courageous, loaded with methanol from Saudi Arabia and Qatar, also called for help.

The US Navy sent a destroyer, the USS Bainbridge, to assist, said Cmdr. Joshua Frey, a 5th Fleet spokesman. He described the ships as being hit in a “reported attack,” without elaborating.

Thursday’s attack resembled that of an attack in May targeting four oil tankers off the nearby Emirati port of Fujairah. US officials similarly accused Iran of targeting the ships with limpet mines, which are magnetic and attach to the hulls of a ship. The mines disable, but don’t sink, a vessel.

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