Iranian oil tanker pursued by US changes destination to Turkey
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Iranian oil tanker pursued by US changes destination to Turkey

After US warns allies not to assist Adrian Darya 1, ship heads to port of Mesrin, some 200 km from Syria refinery to which it was allegedly headed when it was seized off Gibraltar

A supertanker hosting an Iranian flag is seen on the water in the British territory of Gibraltar, August 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Marcos Moreno)
A supertanker hosting an Iranian flag is seen on the water in the British territory of Gibraltar, August 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Marcos Moreno)

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — An Iranian-flagged oil tanker pursued by the US amid heightened tensions between Tehran and Washington changed its listed destination to a port in Turkey early Saturday after Greece said it wouldn’t risk its relations with America by aiding it.

The crew of the Adrian Darya 1, formerly known as the Grace 1, updated its listed destination in its Automatic Identification System to Mesrin, Turkey, a port city in the country’s south and home to an oil terminal.

However, mariners can input any destination into the AIS, so Turkey may not be its true destination. Mesrin is some 200 kilometers (125 miles) northwest of a refinery in Baniyas, Syria, where authorities alleged the Adrian Darya had been heading before being seized off Gibraltar in early July.

Iranian state media and officials did not immediately acknowledge the new reported destination of the Adrian Darya, which carries 2.1 million barrels of Iranian crude oil worth some $130 million. Nor was there any immediate reaction from Turkey, whose President Recep Tayyip Erdogan deals directly with Tehran and Russia over Syria’s long war.

The ship-tracking website MarineTraffic.com showed the Adrian Darya’s position as just south of Sicily in the Mediterranean Sea. At current speeds, it estimated the Adrian Darya would reach Mesrin in about a week.

The State Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The tanker’s detention and later release by Gibraltar has fueled the growing tensions between Iran and the US after President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew America from Iran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers over a year ago. In the time since, Iran lost billions of dollars in trade previously allowed by the deal as the US re-imposed and created sanctions largely blocking Tehran from selling crude oil abroad — a crucial source of hard currency for the Islamic Republic.

In US federal court documents, authorities allege the Adrian Grace’s true owner is Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, a paramilitary organization answerable only to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The US declared the Guard a foreign terror organization in April, the first time America named a military force of a nation as such, giving it the legal power to issue a warrant for the vessel’s seizure. However, that would require another nation to acknowledge the writ.

The Adrian Darya had put its intended destination as Kalamata, Greece, even though the port did not have the infrastructure to offload oil from the tanker. The State Department then pressured Greece not to aid the vessel.

Meanwhile, Iran continues to hold the British-flagged oil tanker Stena Impero, which it seized in a commando-style raid July 19 after the taking of the Adrian Darya. Analysts suggested the release of the Adrian Darya would see the Stena Impero released, but that has yet to happen.

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