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On Rosh Hashanah, Putin lauds Jewish groups for ‘patriotic, charitable projects’

Russian leader hails community for its work ‘to facilitate Russia’s successful development’

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, speaks with Chief Rabbi of Russia Berel Lazar, left, during a ceremony unveiling the memorial to members of the Jewish resistance in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center in Moscow on June 4, 2019. (Sergei Ilnitsky/ Pool/AFP)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, speaks with Chief Rabbi of Russia Berel Lazar, left, during a ceremony unveiling the memorial to members of the Jewish resistance in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center in Moscow on June 4, 2019. (Sergei Ilnitsky/ Pool/AFP)

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday issued a message to the country’s Jewish community for the Rosh Hashanah holiday, in which he praised its work toward developing and pushing the nation forward.

“Jewish religious organizations are doing a lot to facilitate Russia’s successful development, they devote tireless attention to fruitful social work and are actively involved in implementing highly popular educational, enlightenment, patriotic and charitable projects,” he said.

“I am delighted to note their efforts aiming to maintain inter-ethnic and inter-religious peace and accord in this country and their invariable commitment to such intransient universal human values as neighborliness, trust and mutual understanding.”

On Sunday US President Joe Biden issued a greeting to the Jewish community, wishing those who celebrate “a year of health, healing, and progress.”

Biden noted that the High Holiday period, which begins with Rosh Hashanah on Monday evening, commands “those who celebrate to pause, look inward, and reflect on the past year. It is a time to undertake an inventory of the soul, a cheshbon hanefesh, and to ask of ourselves and of each other questions that go beyond our own individual faiths: Who do I want to be? What type of nation do we want to forge? What type of world do we want to create?”

The US president, who is marking the first Rosh Hashanah since he took office in January, said the Jewish new year is “a reminder of our infinite capacity to transform our lives and begin anew.”

He ended with a wish to have the Hebrew year 5782 “be a year of health, healing, and progress” and extended his “warmest wishes to all those celebrating Rosh Hashanah in the United States, Israel, and around the world.”

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