search

US sanctions 2 Lebanon-based firms, Hezbollah-linked businessman

Arch Consulting and Meamar Construction targeted ‘for being owned, controlled, or directed’ by terrorist group

Supporters of Hezbollah terror group leader Hassan Nasrallah chant slogans ahead of his televised speech in a southern suburb of Beirut, Lebanon, January 5, 2020. (Maya Alleruzzo/AP)
Supporters of Hezbollah terror group leader Hassan Nasrallah chant slogans ahead of his televised speech in a southern suburb of Beirut, Lebanon, January 5, 2020. (Maya Alleruzzo/AP)

BEIRUT, Lebanon — The US Treasury on Thursday imposed sanctions on two Lebanon-based companies and a man described as an official with the Lebanese Hezbollah group.

The United States defines the Iran-backed Hezbollah a terrorist organization and has imposed sanctions on many of the militant group’s officials in the past.

The new wave of sanctions comes as Lebanon is passing through its worst economic and financial crisis in decades. The country is also facing a political deadlock amid delays in the formation of a new crisis cabinet, because of a portfolio dispute.

The US Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, or OFAC, sanctioned the companies Arch Consulting and Meamar Construction “for being owned, controlled, or directed by Hezbollah.”

OFAC also sanctioned businessman Sultan Khalifah Asaad, saying that he is a Hezbollah official closely associated with both companies.

“Hezbollah leverages Arch and Meamar to conceal money transfers to Hezbollah’s own accounts, further enriching Hezbollah’s leadership and supporters, and depriving the Lebanese people of much-needed funds,” the US treasury said.

Last week, OFAC sanctioned two former Lebanese cabinet ministers allied with Hezbollah — the ex-finance minister, Ali Hassan Khalil, currently a lawmaker; and the former public works and transportation minister, Youssef Fenianos.

Lebanon’s Prime Minister-designate Muatapha Adib told reporters after meeting President Michel Aoun on Thursday afternoon that he will allow more time for discussions over the formation of a new cabinet.

The talks have stalled over which of Lebanon’s sects will get the finance ministry. Hezbollah and its Shiite ally Amal group of Parliament Speaker Nabih Berri are insisting their sect get the portfolio and that they get to name Shiite ministers in the new cabinet.

On Wednesday, a 15-day deadline passed without Lebanon forming the new cabinet that would be tasked with resolving the economic crisis and carrying out reforms to pave the way for financial aid from the international community.

read more:
comments