After New York attack, Trump rails against Islamic State
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After New York attack, Trump rails against Islamic State

European leaders express solidarity after driver rams truck into cyclists, killing 8; suspect identified as Uzbek Sayfullo Saipov, 29, who immigrated in 2010

US President Donald Trump railed against the Islamic State group Tuesday after a man drove a rented truck onto a bike path in New York City, killing eight people.

Trump said in a tweet, “We must not allow ISIS to return, or enter, our country after defeating them in the Middle East and elsewhere. Enough!”

Trump said he had ordered more robust “extreme vetting” of travelers coming into the United States.

A 2016 mugshot of NY terror attack suspect Sayfullo Saipov (CNN via St. Charles County, Mo)

“I have just ordered Homeland Security to step up our already Extreme Vetting Program. Being politically correct is fine, but not for this!” Trump tweeted.

The president’s attempts at banning travelers from several mainly Muslim nations have been met with successive legal challenges.

New York City’s mayor labeled the attack in Lower Manhattan a cowardly “act of terror.” But local officials have made no mention publicly of the Islamic State group’s possible involvement.

A law enforcement official who was not authorized to discuss the case publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity said witnesses told police the attacker yelled, “Allahu akbar!” as he got out of the truck.

Trump also offered “thoughts, condolences and prayers” to the victims and their families, saying, “God and your country are with you!”

Former president Barack Obama expressed support for those affected by the attack, and praised the tenacity of New Yorkers.

Two law enforcement officials identified the suspected perpetrator as 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov. Unnamed enforcement sources told CNN Saipov was an Uzbekistan national who came to the US in 2010. He was shot by an officer in the abdomen and taken into custody.

Heavily armed police stand guard near the scene after a motorist drove onto a busy bicycle path near the World Trade Center memorial and struck several people Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

The suspect has a Florida license but may have been staying in New Jersey.

Eight people were killed and 11 were seriously injured in the broad daylight assault and first deadly terror-related attack in America’s financial and entertainment capital since the September 11, 2001 Al-Qaeda hijackings brought down the Twin Towers.

The truck driver struck just blocks from the 9/11 Memorial, on the West Side of Lower Manhattan, and close to schools and a park at 3:05 p.m. as children and their parents geared up to celebrate Halloween.

Trump decried him as “very sick” and a “deranged person.”

Authorities investigate the scene near a covered body on a bike path after a motorist drove onto the path near the World Trade Center memorial, striking and killing several people, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Police said he drove a rented Home Depot pickup down a bike and pedestrian lane, plowing into people on foot and bicycles before colliding with a school bus, injuring two adults and two children.

The suspect stepped out of the vehicle, brandishing two apparent handguns, before being shot in the abdomen by a police officer, police said.

A paintball gun and pellet gun were recovered at the scene, police said.

Authorities respond near a damaged school bus Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, in New York (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

“This was an act of terror and a particularly cowardly act of terror aimed at innocent civilians, aimed at people going about their lives who had no idea what was about to hit them,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Police said eight people were killed, six of them men who died on the spot, and two others pronounced dead in hospital. Eleven other people were taken to hospital with serious, but not life-threatening injuries, officials said.

Belgium said one of its nationals was among the victims.

Map locates shooting downtown Manhattan, New York on Octrober 31,2017 (AP)

It was the city’s first terror incident since a pipe bomb exploded in September 2016 in Chelsea, lightly wounding 31 people. An American of Afghan descent, Ahmad Khan Rahimi, was convicted of terrorism on October 16 in relation with the attack.

Heavily armed police reinforcements were stepped up across the city of 8.5 million in the wake of that attack. Home to Wall Street, Broadway and one of the biggest tourist draws in the United States, it frequently goes on high alert.

A planned Halloween parade will go ahead as planned, proving that the city would not bow to threats, officials said.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May said she was appalled by the attack and that Britain stood with New York. “Together we will defeat the evil of terrorism,” she said.

French President Emmanuel Macron also expressed solidarity. “Our fight for freedom unites us more than ever,” he tweeted.

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a joint press conference with US President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House, in Washington, DC, January 27, 2017. (AFP/Mandel Ngan)

While details were preliminary and the investigation still underway, the mayor said the suspect appeared to have been a lone wolf and not part of a wider plot.

US media said the suspect shouted “Allahu akbar” and police chief James O’Neill confirmed that he made a statement when he exited the vehicle.

“If you just look at the M.O. of the attack, that’s consistent with what’s been going on. So that along with the statement has enabled us to label this a terrorist event,” he said.

In New York, police officers and ambulances swamped the area, in front of a park and next to a school as sirens wailed continuously and helicopters roared through the sky.

Worried parents gathered outside a public elementary school that had closed, waiting to see if they could collect children who stayed after the end of the classes for extracurricular lessons and activities.

John Williams, 22, on his way to a park at the time, said he did not witness the shooting, but arrived 30 seconds afterward.

“There was a smell of gunshots,” he told AFP. “There was a man lying on the ground. It looked as if he’d been shot.”

Investigators inspect a truck used by an apparent terrorist to mow down cyclists in New York on October 31, 2017 (AFP Photo/Don Emmert)

State Governor Andrew Cuomo said the city was a “target” as an “international symbol of freedom and democracy.”

“We’ve lived with this before, we’ve felt the pain before. We feel the pain today. But we go forward together,” he added.

A witness who gave his name only as Frank told local television network NY1 that he saw a man running around an intersection, heard five to six gunshots and saw “about 100 cops” flood into the street.

“When the cops shot him, everybody started running away and it got a little bit crazy right there. So when I tried to look again, the guy was already down,” the witness said.

Tuesday’s attack came five months after a US Navy veteran plowed a car into pedestrians in Times Square, killing an 18-year-old woman from Michigan and injuring 22 other people on May 18 in what de Blasio said was not an act of terror.

Previously, the most serious security breach in New York since Faisal Shahzad, a Pakistani immigrant, plant a car bomb in Times Square on May 1, 2010.

His explosive device failed to detonate and he was arrested shortly after boarding a flight to the Middle East. He pleaded guilty and said he was aiming to avenge deaths from US missiles fired from drones operating over Pakistan. He was sentenced to life behind bars.

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