Oskar Schindler’s personal possessions hit auction block
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Oskar Schindler’s personal possessions hit auction block

Wristwatch, compass and pens of iconic savior of Jews during the Holocaust come from the estate of his wife Emilie, who died in 2001

Oskar Schindler during one of more than one dozen visits he made to Israel, beginning in 1961. During the Holocaust, Schindler used his factory and bribes to help save Jews from deportation to Nazi-built death camps (public domain)
Oskar Schindler during one of more than one dozen visits he made to Israel, beginning in 1961. During the Holocaust, Schindler used his factory and bribes to help save Jews from deportation to Nazi-built death camps (public domain)

BOSTON — Several personal possessions of Oskar Schindler, the German industrialist who saved the lives of about 1,200 Jews during World War II, are up for auction.

Schindler’s Longines wristwatch, a compass he and his wife reportedly used in 1945 as they fled advancing Russians, two Parker fountain pens, and several other items are being sold by Boston-based RR Auction.

The belongings being sold as a package are expected to fetch about $25,000 in the auction that ends March 6.

RR’s executive vice president Bobby Livingston says the possessions are from the estate of Schindler’s wife, Emilie, who died in 2001.

Schindler, a Nazi party member whose story was told in the 1993 Oscar-winning movie “Schindler’s List,” saved Jews by employing then in his enamelware and munitions factory in Krakow. During the war years, he spent his entire fortune on bribes of Nazi officials and supplies his workers needed to survive, emerging from the war a destitute man.

He died in 1974.

Schindler is buried on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, the only member of the Nazi party Israel has allowed to receive such an honor, and has a tree planted in his name at Yad Vashem’s Avenue of the Righteous.

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

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