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Rabbinical court rules divorced dad can vaccinate kids despite mom’s objection

Ruling permitting man to inoculate his children against COVID accuses anti-vaxxers of ‘trying to sow fear and terror among the public’

Illustrative -- Child receives a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Jerusalem on December 21, 2021 (Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)
Illustrative -- Child receives a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Jerusalem on December 21, 2021 (Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)

A rabbinical court has ruled that a divorced father may vaccinate his young twins against the coronavirus despite the objections of their mother, it was reported on Wednesday.

“It was clear to me that I wanted to vaccinate the children — for health and also so they don’t infect those around them,” Guy, a father of six-year-old twins, told Channel 13 news.

Guy, whose identity was obscured, also said that it was hard for children so young to wear masks all the time, indicating that without vaccination they could be more likely to catch the coronavirus or pass it on.

“The moment that [the authorities] started to vaccinate, I went to my ex-wife to see if we could vaccinate them. She refused twice, so I went to court on the grounds that it was for the good of the children,” Guy said.

The father approached the rabbinical court in Jerusalem and asked whether the children could be vaccinated over the objections of their mother.

Rabbinical courts in Israel are part of the judiciary, dealing with issues of marriage and custody for Jews in the country no matter their level of religious observance.

Illustrative: A woman stands outside the Jerusalem Rabbinical Court (Nati Shohat/Flash 90)

The court gave a detailed answer explaining that it was for the good of the children that they be vaccinated.

Additionally, in his ruling, Rabbi Tzvi Ben Yaakov issued a sharp criticism of those who are oppose vaccination and are “trying to sow fear and terror among the public.”

The report did not say whether the twins had been vaccinated or if the ruling had been appealed.

Israel began vaccinating children aged 5-11 in November. As of Wednesday evening, 20.1 percent of children in that age group had received at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine.

As the campaign to vaccinate children kicked off, leading officials associated with it became subject to threats, most notably Dr. Sharon Alroy-Preis, the head of public health services at the Health Ministry, who has been provided with a full-time security detail.

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