India hangs terrorist from 2008 attacks on Chabad House
search

India hangs terrorist from 2008 attacks on Chabad House

Mohammad Ajmal Kasab was the sole surviving member of the crew that killed 166 people in Mumbai

A Chabad menora in Mumbai, India. (photo credit: Serge Attal/Flash90)
A Chabad menora in Mumbai, India. (photo credit: Serge Attal/Flash90)

MUMBAI, India (AP) — India executed the lone surviving gunman from the 2008 terror attack on Mumbai early Wednesday, the country’s home ministry said.

Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, a Pakistani citizen, was one of 10 gunmen who rampaged through the streets of India’s financial capital for three days in November 2008, killing 166 people.

Kasab was hanged in secrecy at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday at a jail in Pune, a city near Mumbai, after Indian President Pranab Mukherjee rejected his plea for mercy.

Union Home Minister Sushil Kumar Shinde said the home ministry sent Kasab’s mercy plea to Mukherjee on Oct. 16. Mukherjee rejected it on Nov. 5, he said.

“It was decided then that on Nov. 21 at 7:30 in the morning he would be hanged. That procedure has been completed today,” Shinde said.

The three-day attack was broadcast live on television, transfixing India and the world

R.R. Patil, the home minister for the state of Maharashtra, where Mumbai is located, called the execution a tribute to “all innocent people and police officers who lost their lives in this heinous attack on our nation.”

Indian authorities faced public pressure to quickly execute Kasab, and the government fast-tracked the appeal and execution process, which often can take years, or in some cases, decades.

Kasab and the other gunmen entered Mumbai by boat on Nov. 26, 2008. Carrying mobile phones, grenades and automatic weapons, the gunmen fanned out across India’s financial capital, targeting luxury hotels, a Jewish center and the city’s main train station. The three-day attack was broadcast live on television, transfixing the nation and world.

Captured by a photographer striding through Mumbai’s main train station, an assault rifle in hand, the baby-faced Kasab quickly became the iconic image of the siege.

India blames Laskhar e-Taiba, a militant Pakistani organization, for orchestrating the attacks. The incident inflamed relations between the nuclear-armed neighbors.

An Indian judge sentenced Kasab to death in May 2010 for waging war against India, murder and terrorism, among other charges. Kasab cried that day as he heard the sentence.

Join us!
A message from the Editor of Times of Israel
David Horovitz

The Times of Israel covers one of the most complicated, and contentious, parts of the world. Determined to keep readers fully informed and enable them to form and flesh out their own opinions, The Times of Israel has gradually established itself as the leading source of independent and fair-minded journalism on Israel, the region and the Jewish world.

We've achieved this by investing ever-greater resources in our journalism while keeping all of the content on our site free.

Unlike many other news sites, we have not put up a paywall. But we would like to invite readers who can afford to do so, and for whom The Times of Israel has become important, to help support our journalism by joining The Times of Israel Community. Join now and for as little as $6 a month you can both help ensure our ongoing investment in quality journalism, and enjoy special status and benefits as a Times of Israel Community member.

Become a member of The Times of Israel Community
read more:
comments