Shofar program blows sounds of Rosh Hashanah into public spaces
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Blowin' in the wind

Shofar program blows sounds of Rosh Hashanah into public spaces

Tzohar, which aims to bridge the religious-secular gap, hosts Shofar in the Park to bring New Year’s notes to masses

Jessica Steinberg covers the Sabra scene from south to north and back to the center.

Tzohar's Yom Kippur services, hosted annually in 350 communities around the country (Courtesy Tzohar)
Tzohar's Yom Kippur services, hosted annually in 350 communities around the country (Courtesy Tzohar)

Want to hear the shofar but not interested in going to synagogue?

Tzohar, the organization that aims to bridge gaps between Israel’s religious and secular populations, is hosting Shofar in the Park, a program encouraging more people to hear the clarion call of the ram’s horn on the Jewish New Year.

Volunteers from Tzohar and Ohr Torah Stone’s Yachad program will gather in public spaces throughout Israel on both afternoons of Rosh Hashanah to blow the shofar and discuss the Jewish New Year.

A list of Israeli cities with a drop-down menu of neighborhoods, parks, and Tzohar contacts is available on the Tzohar website, in Hebrew and English.

The shofar-blowing activity developed from Tzohar’s annual Yom Kippur program, which has grown to 350 communities around Israel hosting Praying Together Yom Kippur services. This year, Tzohar expects to host 65,000 participants.

The concept is to make the high holidays more accessible, interesting, and relevant to Jews of all levels of observance, said Rabbi David Stav, the founder of Tzohar.

The Tzohar website also has a list of communities hosting Yom Kippur services, and users can order etrog and lulav sets for Sukkot, with delivery around the country.

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