Poll shows Americans split on Iran deal
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Poll shows Americans split on Iran deal

Rasmussen survey shows US citizens split down the middle over agreement with Tehran, while Reuters poll reveals wide support for Geneva accord

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, center, attends talks in Geneva on Iran's nuclear program, November 22, 2013. (photo credit: AP/Fabrice Coffrini)
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, center, attends talks in Geneva on Iran's nuclear program, November 22, 2013. (photo credit: AP/Fabrice Coffrini)

Americans are nearly evenly divided over the deal reached between Iran and the P5+1 world powers, with 43 percent of the public maintaining that the agreement would end up damaging US interests in the Middle East, while 41% believe the deal will curb Iran’s capability of producing a nuclear weapon, a survey found Wednesday.

16% of respondents said they were undecided on the matter, according to Rasmussen, which released the poll.

The survey was conducted among 1,000 likely voters on November 25-26, and the margin of error was projected to be three percentage points.

The six-month interim deal, signed in Geneva earlier this week, includes greater access for UN inspectors to Iran and a cap on the level of uranium enrichment, in exchange for eased sanctions.

On Tuesday, a poll conducted by Ipsos and Reuters showed that 44% of Americans backed the deal, while only 22% were against.

37% of Americans in that poll believed the US “should hold a hard line with Iran and maintain or expand current sanctions,” while 36% claimed the US had a “right to improve diplomatic relations with Tehran.”

The poll also found that over 40% of Americans believe that among all Middle Eastern countries, Iran poses the largest threat to the US and its allies.

An overwhelming majority, 63%, asserted that Iran’s nuclear program was ultimately aimed at developing weapons of mass destruction.

The Reuters/Ipsos survey polled 591 people, and had a confidence interval of 4.9 percentage points.

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