Jordan’s king endorses Palestinian reconciliation deal
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Jordan’s king endorses Palestinian reconciliation deal

Abdullah II 'affirms Jordan's full support' for agreement to end decade-old split between Fatah and Hamas terror group

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, left receives Jordan's King Abdullah II at his headquarters, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, on August 7, 2017. (AP Photo/ Nasser Nasser)
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, left receives Jordan's King Abdullah II at his headquarters, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, on August 7, 2017. (AP Photo/ Nasser Nasser)

AMMAN, Jordan — Jordan’s king has endorsed a fledgling Palestinian reconciliation agreement that is meant to end a decade-old political and ideological split between rivals Hamas and Fatah.

King Abdullah II expressed support for the Egyptian-brokered deal after meeting Sunday with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, who heads Fatah.

The Hamas terrorist group seized control of the Gaza Strip in 2007 in a bloody coup, leaving Abbas with autonomous enclaves in the West Bank.

The palace said that the king “affirmed Jordan’s full support for this agreement,” which it said would strengthen Palestinian unity. Jordan, which considers itself a key Mideast mediator, was not directly involved in reconciliation efforts.

Under an emerging deal, an Abbas-led government would run Gaza, but critical issues remain unresolved.

From left in front row, Hamas leader in the Gaza Strip Yahya Sinwar, Head of Palestinian General Intelligence Majid Faraj, Head of the Hamas political bureau Ismail Haniyeh, PA Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah and an Egyptian mediator hold their hands up during a meeting in Gaza City, October 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Prime Minister Office, File)

Earlier this month US special envoy Jason Greenblatt said that while the US welcomed the reconciliation talks, the terror group must accept the Quartet’s principles in order for a government it sits in to receive diplomatic recognition.

“The United States stresses that any Palestinian government must unambiguously and explicitly commit to nonviolence, recognition of the State of Israel, acceptance of previous agreements and obligations between the parties, and peaceful negotiations,” Greenblatt said.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has also protested Hamas’s refusal to disarm and continued support terror activity, saying Israel would oppose reconciliation efforts.

“Continuing to dig tunnels, manufacture missiles and initiate terrorist attacks against Israel are incompatible with the Quartet principles and the efforts of the United States to renew the diplomatic process,” he said after the deal was announced.

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