TEHRAN — Iran held major anti-Israel rallies across the country Friday, with protesters chanting “Death to Israel” and declaring that destroying the Jewish state is “the Muslim world’s top priority.”

Iranians participating in Quds Day rallies also called for unity among pro-Palestinian groups against the “child-murdering” Israeli government, according to Iran’s Tasnim News Agency.

Marchers in Tehran headed from various points of the city to the Friday prayer ceremony at Tehran University. Similar demonstrations were held in other cities and towns in Iran.

Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guard used the demonstration in the capital’s Valiasr Square to showcase three surface-to-surface ballistic missiles, including the Zolfaghar — the type that Iran used this week to target the Islamic State group in Syria. The Guard said it fired six such missiles on Sunday at IS targets in the city of Deir el-Zour, more than 600 kilometers (370 miles) away. The Guard said the airstrike was in retaliation for an IS attack earlier in June on Iran’s parliament and a shrine in Tehran that killed 18 people and wounded more than 50.

Another missile on display at the Tehran rally was the Ghadr, with a range of 2,000 kilometers (1,250 miles) that can reach both Israel and US bases in the region.

Iran’s ballistic missile program has been the subject of persistent concern in Washington and the target of repeated US sanctions.

Iranian protesters burn representations of US and Israeli flags in their annual pro-Palestinian rally marking Al-Quds (Jerusalem) Day, as a Ghadr H surface-to-surface ballistic missile is displayed by Revolutionary Guard, in Tehran, Iran, Friday, June 23, 2017. A portrait of the late Iranian revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini and Jerusalem's Dome of Rock hangs from a building in background. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Iranian protesters burn representations of US and Israeli flags in their annual pro-Palestinian rally marking Al-Quds (Jerusalem) Day, as a Ghadr H surface-to-surface ballistic missile is displayed by Revolutionary Guard, in Tehran, Iran, Friday, June 23, 2017. A portrait of the late Iranian revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini and Jerusalem’s Dome of Rock hangs from a building in background. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Iran claimed its missile strike on Sunday killed 360 Islamic State fighters. Israeli sources, by contrast, said the strike was a “flop,” that most of the six or seven missiles missed their targets, and that three of them fell to earth in Iraq and didn’t even reach Syria.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, in remarks carried by the official IRNA news agency, said Israel supports “terrorists in the region.”

Parliament speaker Ali Larijani, in a speech to Tehran demonstrators, called Israel the “mother of terrorism” and said that in the “20th century, there was no event more ominous than establishing the Zionist regime.”

The rally also inaugurated a huge digital countdown display at Tehran Palestine Square, showing that Israel will allegedly cease to exist in 8,411 days.

In 2015, Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei predicted that after 25 years — by 2040 — there will no longer be a State of Israel.

An Iranian man holds a poster bearing images of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, US President Donald Trump and Saudi King Salam during a parade marking al-Quds (Jerusalem) day in Tehran on June 23, 2017. (AFP PHOTO / STRINGER)

An Iranian man holds a poster bearing images of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, US President Donald Trump and Saudi King Salam during a parade marking al-Quds (Jerusalem) day in Tehran on June 23, 2017. (AFP PHOTO / STRINGER)

“Death to the House of Saud and Daesh,” demonstrators chanted, using another name for the Islamic State. “Death to America”, “Death to Israel”, “Death to the UK.”

This year’s commemoration comes amid an intensifying battle for influence in the region between Shiite Iran and its Sunni arch rival Saudi Arabia who have had no diplomatic relations since January last year.

State media put the number of participants at over 1 million.

An Iranian girl holds a model of a missile during a rally marking al-Quds (Jerusalem) Day in Tehran on June 23, 2017. (AFP PHOTO / Stringer)

An Iranian girl holds a model of a missile during a rally marking al-Quds (Jerusalem) Day in Tehran on June 23, 2017. (AFP PHOTO / Stringer)

The anti-Israel rallies are an annual event marking Al-Quds Day, a historic Arabic name for Jerusalem. Iran says it’s an occasion to express support for the Palestinians and emphasize the importance of Jerusalem for Muslims.

Iran doesn’t recognize Israel, calls for its demise, and staunchly backs terror groups, including Hamas and Hezbollah.

An Iranian man rides his bicycle on top of a reproduction of an Israeli flag painted on the street during a rally marking al-Quds (Jerusalem) Day in Tehran on June 23, 2017. (AFP PHOTO / Stringer)

An Iranian man rides his bicycle on top of a reproduction of an Israeli flag painted on the street during a rally marking al-Quds (Jerusalem) Day in Tehran on June 23, 2017. (AFP PHOTO / Stringer)

In comments ahead of the day, Khamenei said the rallies were meant to “fight arrogance and global hegemons,” likely hinting at recent tensions with Sunni Gulf states.

“Defending Palestine today is defending a reality much greater than the issue of Palestine,” he said, according to the semi-official Tasnim News site.

Iran holds al-Quds day rallies held each year on the last Friday of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, which is expected to end this weekend. Iran has marked the day since the start of its 1979 Islamic Revolution, when it cut relations with Israel.

On Sunday, marchers in the annual Quds Day parade in London blamed a fire in a low-income apartment complex there that left at least 58 dead on “Zionists.”