The death of 23-year-old Shlomit Krigman, who sustained serious injuries during a stabbing attack in the West Bank settlement of Beit Horon Monday and died of her wounds Tuesday morning, left the young woman’s friends and relatives shaken, as they grieved and recalled her warm heart, artistic nature, and her social conscience.

“She was a caring person, close and caring toward her friends,” Einat Dermer told the NRG news site. “She was just a person who wanted everything to be good, and she did that in her own way.”

Krigman, who had previously served as a group leader for the Bnei Akiva Youth Group in Beit Horon, was spending time with her grandparents in the settlement when she was attacked, according to a message from the community sent out Tuesday morning.

Though originally from the West Bank settlement of Shadmot Mehola, located in the Beit She’an Valley, Krigman spent much time in Beit Horon, outside Jerusalem, and was seen as a resident by many who lived in the small settlement.

“Shlomit, your address may have been in Shadmot Mehola, but you were without a doubt a resident of Beit Horon,” one resident wrote on Facebook in tribute to her. “Shlomit, part of the landscape of Beit Horon, a smiling, quiet flower who brightened up her surroundings.”

Krigman’s cousin Danny Hirschberg, who heads the national-religious Bnei Akiva group in Israel, said his family was in “great pain.”

“We had a hard night of turmoil and hopes that ended with a great sadness,” he told Ynet. “Shlomit was a beloved, sweet girl, always smiling, energetic and full of light. We are in great pain. Let us hope for better days.”

Krigman had recently completed her bachelors degree in industrial design at the University of Ariel, and was trying to decide on a path to pursue in the field.

“Shlomit, a daughter of Shadmot Mehola, was a sweet and gentle girl,” Matti Carmi, a close personal friend, told Ynet. “She studied industrial design at Ariel and displayed an amazing final project; she built a mobile library. She was a talented girl, sociable and loved by everyone.”

Krigman’s funeral was scheduled for 1 p.m. at Jerusalem’s Har Hamenuhot Cemetery. She is survived by her parents and her six siblings.

Following the stabbing attack at Beit Horon, Krigman was evacuated to Hadassah Hospital in Mount Scopus in critical condition where her condition was defined as life-threatening. Despite efforts to stabilize her, she died in the early hours of Tuesday morning, a statement from the hospital said.

Another woman, 58, was moderately injured in the attack, which took place outside a small market in the settlement.

Medics wheel a wounded Israeli woman into the emergency room of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center on January 25, 2016. She was one of two Israeli women injured in a stabbing attack at the entrance to Beit Horon, in the West Bank. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

Medics wheel a wounded Israeli woman into the emergency room of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center on January 25, 2016. She was one of two Israeli women injured in a stabbing attack at the entrance to Beit Horon, in the West Bank. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

The Magen David Adom rescue service said Krigman was in critical condition when they arrived on the scene.

“They took us to a woman … who was unconscious and suffering from stab wounds to the upper body,” senior MDA medic Lior Levy said. “We put her in the intensive care ambulance and gave her lifesaving treatment on the way to the hospital. She was in very serious condition.”

Both attackers, one from nearby Beit Ur al-Tahta and one from the Ramallah area, were shot and killed by a security guard. One victim was stabbed in the store and a second as the two attackers attempted to flee the scene, according to initial accounts.

Security footage showed the two terrorists, clad in black and with knives raised, attempting to enter the grocery store, but being blocked by a man, store owner Mordechai Shalem, who pushed them away with the shopping cart.

During a sweep of the surrounding area, police officers found two “suspicious objects,” which they feared could be pipe bombs, a police spokesperson said. A sapper was called to the scene to determine if the objects were indeed improvised explosive devices, and disarm them if need be, the official said.

Officials said later that the devices were improvised bombs, pointing to a well-planned attack.

The two terrorists were named as Ibrahim Al’an, 23, from the West Bank Palestinian village of Beit Ur al-Tahta, and Hassin Abu Gush, 17, from the Qalandiya refugee camp near Jerusalem.

Police officers and emergency service employees at the scene of a terror attack in which two people were wounded by two Palestinian stabbers, in the West Bank settlement of Beit Horon on Monday, January 25 2016 .(Israel Police)

Police officers and emergency service employees at the scene of a terror attack in which two people were wounded by two Palestinian stabbers, in the West Bank settlement of Beit Horon on Monday, January 25 2016 .(Israel Police)

The settlement, home to some 300 families, is situated alongside Route 443, a major highway leading to Jerusalem, and has been mostly immune to other violence that has rocked parts of the West Bank in the last five months. A Border Police base is located next to the entrance of the settlement.

The terror attack was the third in just over a week to take place inside a settlement. On January 17, a terrorist infiltrated the settlement of Otniel in the southern West Bank, stabbing mother-of-six Dafna Meir to death.

A day later, a terrorist sneaked into the settlement of Tekoa, south of Jerusalem, and knifed a pregnant woman, Michal Froman, moderately wounding her.

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.