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Neo-Nazi who shot dead 3 at Kansas Jewish sites dies on death row

Founder of the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Frazier Glenn Miller, 80, had testified at trial that he wanted to kill Jews before he died

Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., convicted of capital murder, attempted murder and other charges, gestures as Johnson County deputies remove him from the courtroom during the sentencing phase of his trial at the Johnson County District Court in Olathe, Kan. November 10, 2015. (Joe Ledford/The Kansas City Star via AP, Pool, File)
Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., convicted of capital murder, attempted murder and other charges, gestures as Johnson County deputies remove him from the courtroom during the sentencing phase of his trial at the Johnson County District Court in Olathe, Kan. November 10, 2015. (Joe Ledford/The Kansas City Star via AP, Pool, File)

An avowed US antisemite who testified that he wanted to kill Jews and was sentenced to death after he shot and killed three people at Jewish sites in suburban Kansas City in 2014 has died in prison, the Kansas Department of Corrections said Tuesday.

Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., 80, died Monday at the El Dorado Correctional Facility, where he was serving a sentence for capital murder, attempted murder, assault and firearms convictions.

An autopsy will be performed to determine a cause of death, but preliminary indications were that Miller died of natural causes, Carol Pitts, a spokeswoman for the corrections department, said in a news release. She declined to comment further on Miller’s death or medical condition.

In March, Miller’s attorneys argued before the Kansas Supreme Court that his death sentence should be overturned, in part because they said he should not have been allowed to represent himself at trial.

Miller drove from his home in Aurora, Missouri, determined to kill Jews. On April 13, 2014, he ambushed William Corporon, 69; and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Underwood, at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kansas. He then drove to the nearby Village Shalom care center and killed Terri LaManno. None of the victims were Jewish.

On Tuesday, Mindy Corporon, the mother of Underwood and daughter to Corporon, published her account of their lives and her counseling of other families who have been victims of violence. “Healing a Shattered Soul: My Faithful Journey of Courageous Kindness after the Trauma and Grief of Domestic Terrorism” does not mention Miller’s name.

Her publicist released a statement that also omits his name.

“The murderer took the lives of two Methodists and a Catholic while intending to murder Jews,” Corporon said in the statement. “No one should have lost their lives at his hands. We are neither happy nor sad. He stole so much from our family, but he didn’t steal our hearts or our dignity. He did not steal our memories, the love that sustains us or the ability to offer forgiveness and kindness in the face of such tragedy.

Overland Park JCC shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., also known as Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., appears at his arraignment in New Century, Kansas, April 15, 2014. (photo credit: AP/David Eulitt)

Miller, also known as Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., testified at trial that he wanted to kill Jewish people before he died. He said he didn’t expect to live long because he had chronic emphysema.

During his trial and at his sentencing, Miller frequently interrupted the proceedings to give rambling statements about his belief that Jewish people were running the government, media and the Federal Reserve.

During his closing arguments at trial, Miller said he had been “floating on a cloud” since the killings. When he was convicted and when he was sentenced to death, Miller raised his arm in the Nazi salute.

Miller was a Vietnam War veteran who founded the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in his native North Carolina and later the White Patriot Party. He also ran on a white power platform during campaigns for the US House in 2006 and the US Senate in 2010 in Missouri.

In arguments before the Kansas Supreme Court in March appealing his death sentence, Miller’s attorneys argued that he was incapable of understanding the legal intricacies of a complicated death penalty case and should not have been allowed to represent himself, even though he insisted on being his own attorney.

Attorney Reid Nelson said Miller’s standby attorneys should have been allowed to intervene during the penalty phase.

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