A federal judge rescinded a $900,000 jury award to a New York restaurant deliveryman who said he was the victim of anti-Semitism.

Brooklyn District Court Judge Leo Glasser earlier this week tossed out the award for Adam Wiercinski and referred a transcript of his testimony from last year’s trial to the Brooklyn U.S. Attorney’s office for investigation, the New York Daily News reported. New evidence showed that Wiercinski used a fake name to collect salary and benefits from the Mangia 57 restaurant in Manhattan.

A jury last October found in favor of Wiercinski, who said his co-workers spent years calling him a “dirty Jew” and throwing pennies at him while making anti-Semitic comments.

Wiercinski, 61, has said that he did not quit because he was concerned that at his age he would have difficulty finding a new job.

The jury in Brooklyn federal court reached a verdict in favor of Wiercinski on October 24 in four hours.

One manager at the Mangia 57 restaurant in Manhattan would pass gas in front of Wiercinski and then joke that it was Zyklon B, which was used in the Nazi gas chambers during the Holocaust, the New York Post reported citing the lawsuit.

Much of Wiercinski’s father’s family died at the hands of the Nazis, he told the newspaper. He said he had to explain what Zyklon B was to the jury, because they were “very young.”

“When I explain how it was used in the gas chambers, they were very serious. Everybody [in the courtroom] was silent,” he told the Post.