Components of the bomb used in the terrorist attack on Israelis last year in the Bulgarian resort town of Burgas originated in Poland, Bulgarian media reported Monday

According to the daily Trud, the remote control and detonator for the bomb were smuggled to Bulgaria on a train from Warsaw in June 2012, hidden in backpacks filled with tourist gear, including cameras and cellphones.

The blast, on July 18 of that year, killed five Israeli tourists and a Bulgarian driver, injuring dozens more.

The Bulgarian interior ministry published the photos last week of two suspects, identifying them as Meliad Farah, also known as Hussein Hussein, an Australian citizen born November 5, 1980; and Hassan El Hajj Hassan, a Canadian citizen born March 22, 1988. Both are Lebanese born. A third man who served as the suicide bomber has yet to be identified.

According to Trud, Farah picked up the components from the train in Bulgaria and assembled the bomb. Farah then transported the bomb in a car rented under a fake American license with the name Brian Jameson.

These head-shots provided by the Bulgarian Interior Ministry shows Canadian citizen Hassan El Hajj Hassan, right, and Australian citizen Meliad Farah, also known as Hussein Hussein, left, both suspected of being involved in the July 2012 Burgas bombing. (photo credit: courtesy Bulgarian Interior Ministry)

These head-shots provided by the Bulgarian Interior Ministry shows Canadian citizen Hassan El Hajj Hassan, right, and Australian citizen Meliad Farah, also known as Hussein Hussein, left, both suspected of being involved in the July 2012 Burgas bombing. (photo credit: Bulgarian Interior Ministry)

According to the Canadian 24 Hours daily, quoted by AFP on Friday, Hezbollah wired some $100,000 to the two men to help coordinate the attack. The paper cited foreign intelligence services as saying that the funds were transferred to the men’s Australian and Canadian bank accounts respectively.

A Bulgarian newspaper reported that the men had undergone training in Lebanon in 2010 and 2011.

Hezbollah’s military wing was accused of involvement in the attack, an allegation it denied. The Bulgarian government has long believed Hezbollah was behind the bombing, and last month, presented further evidence linking a known operative of the Lebanese group to the manufacturer of the fake IDs used by the suspects.

In March, a criminal court in Cyprus found another Hezbollah member guilty of helping to plan attacks on Israelis on the Mediterranean island.

The EU, partially in response to the new evidence and allegations from Bulgaria, last week formally blacklisted the military wing of Hezbollah as a terrorist organization.