Smurfette, the first female Smurf, of the long-running children’s comedy franchise, has been scratched from posters in the ultra-Orthodox city of Bnei Brak, near Tel Aviv.

Instead, an all-male line-up of the blue folk appears on the posters, in the run-up to the release of the latest movie, “Smurfs: the Lost Village.”

Bnei Brak, a mostly ultra-Orthodox city, has an ordinance that prevents the hanging of posters of women that “might incite the feelings of the city’s residents.”

Other entertainment icons to have been erased from advertising posters in Bnei Brak and Jerusalem — which also has a large ultra-Orthodox community — include Jennifer Lawrence, star of the Hunger Games, and Tinkerbell, the cartoon character from Peter Pan.

Smurfette, brought to life in the movie with the voice of pop star Demi Lovato, plays a leading role in the new film. Along with Brainy, Clumsy and Hefty, she gets to race through the Forbidden Forest to discover what is said to be the biggest secret in Smurf history.

Smurfette was originally created by the evil wizard Gargamel to use her female charms to cause division and envy between the all-male Smurfs.

Her transformation from bad to good took place when Papa Smurf cast a spell on her and changed her hair color from black to blonde in a process called plastic smurfery.

She was introduced into a magazine cartoon in 1966 but only became a permanent fixture in the animated TV series in the 1980s.

Her TV role was said to be important to raise sales of Smurf toys among young girls.