Trump taps Jewish aide Stephen Miller to write inaugural address
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Trump taps Jewish aide Stephen Miller to write inaugural address

Incoming senior White House adviser was Trump's chief campaign speechwriter, reportedly crafted his infamous 'global interests' speech

Eric Cortellessa covers American politics for The Times of Israel.

Stephen Miller speaking at a Donald Trump campaign rally in Anaheim, California, May 25, 2016. (Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)
Stephen Miller speaking at a Donald Trump campaign rally in Anaheim, California, May 25, 2016. (Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — President-elect Donald Trump has commissioned aide Stephen Miller, who penned a controversial speech panned for anti-Semitic overtones, to write his historic inaugural address next month.

The 31-year-old incoming senior White House adviser on policy, who is Jewish, is credited with writing most of Trump’s planned speeches during the campaign, including a controversial October address in which he spoke of Democratic rival Hillary Clinton conducting secret meetings with international bankers to destroy US sovereignty.

Trump’s remarks were criticized at the time by the Anti-Defamation League for “rhetoric and tropes that historically have been used against Jews and still spur antisemitism,” and others noted its similarities to the anti-Semitic tract “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.”

That text is a famous anti-Semitic forgery that promulgated the conspiracy theory that a Jewish-run cabal of global financial elites controlled world affairs.

Other noted speeches that Miller crafted include Trump’s Republican national convention address, which was noted for its dark tones and portrayal of a rapidly deteriorating world.

According to Politico, Trump’s team of insiders is planning to spotlight the incoming president’s first-term agenda in “nationalistic” rather than “ideological” terms, calling for the need to address the nation’s border security, rebuild its infrastructure, strengthen its military and prevent American jobs from going overseas.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks on during the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio. (AFP Photo/Brendan Smialowski)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks on during the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio. (AFP Photo/Brendan Smialowski)

Miller, Trump’s de facto chief speech writer, will be responsible for articulating that vision in what will be Trump’s first direct address to the nation and world as president.

It is not yet clear whether Miller will revive Trump’s contentious statement from July’s GOP convention, when the candidate said of America’s set of national problems: “I alone can fix it.”

Earlier this month, Trump announced Miller would assume an official role in the administration. “As senior adviser to the president for policy, Miller will… be responsible for directing White House policy staff, managing speechwriting functions, and working to ensure the enactment of the President’s policy agenda,” the transition team said in a statement.

Originally from Santa Monica, California, Miller was reportedly born to liberal Jewish Democrats, but became a conservative later in life when he read the National Rifle Association’s CEO Wayne LaPierre’s book “Guns, Crime, and Freedom” and subsequently became a gun enthusiast.

After graduating from Duke University in 2009, he was hired by Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions, the first senator to endorse Trump’s candidacy and now his nominee to be attorney general.

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