Internet giant Yahoo announced that it is set to acquire a small Israeli startup named ClarityRay, which develops software to help publishers identify fraudulent ads. While Yahoo executives Friday did not disclose the full details of the deal, experts estimated that the Israeli company would receive between $15 to 25 million, according to the Marker.

ClarityRay, a small, six person venture, was founded in 2012, after raising half a million dollars with the help of Israeli entrepreneur Sa’ar Wilf, one of the founders of Fraudulent Sciences, a company which was sold to PayPal for $170,000,000. The startup broke even a year later and has been profitable ever since.

“Our vision has always been making the eco-system safe, compliant and sustainable for consumers, publishers and advertisers,” ClarityRay said in a statement posted on their website only shortly after the acquisition was confirmed.

“We helped the online advertising industry take a big step towards that direction by identifying, measuring, and solving many of its unseen hurdles inhibiting that. We brought traffic clarity to an amazing roster of clients, with our findings becoming an industry standard,” the statement added.

“Joining Yahoo now will allow us to make use of that momentum and take the next steps (or rather, leaps) towards that vision, and we couldn’t be more excited. This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity enables the mass scaling of our technology, impact and ideas to the absolute forefront of our field, while working with an amazing team who shares our passion. We’re proud to call Yahoo ‘home’.”

ClarityRay is the second Israeli company to be purchased by Yahoo in just a matter of months, after RayV, which specializes in video streaming technology, struck a nearly $40 million deal with the mega-web site in late May. Yahoo under CEO Marissa Mayer has invested heavily in the acquisition of smaller tech companies, especially startups which focus on video streaming, across the world.

Israeli hi-tech companies have been the center of focus for quite some time, with several leading companies devoting special attention to the Israeli scene.

On Saturday, Apple announced that it would appoint five vice presidents for the company, among them one Israeli. Johnny Srouji, an Arab-Israeli Haifa native, joined Apple in 2008 after completing his studies at the Technion, Ynet reported. He specialized in development of chips for computers and tablets, and will continue to oversee the company’s production of chips in his new position.