Court reinstates Temple Mount ban on activist Glick
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Court reinstates Temple Mount ban on activist Glick

Judge says presence of rabbi and would-be Likud MK, who was nearly killed in shooting attack last year, could provoke violence

File: Temple Mount activist Yehudah Glick walks by Israeli police officers after leaving the Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem's Old City, October 10, 2013. (Sliman Khader/Flash90)
File: Temple Mount activist Yehudah Glick walks by Israeli police officers after leaving the Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem's Old City, October 10, 2013. (Sliman Khader/Flash90)

The Jerusalem District Court reinstated a restraining order barring right-wing activist Yehuda Glick, who was shot and severely wounded in an assassination attempt last year, from visiting the Temple Mount.

The decision reversed a Magistrates’ Court ruling last month, which had granted Glick a monthly visit scheduled by police officials. He was not to be allowed to hold a smartphone or a camera during his visits so as not to offend Muslim worshipers at the contested holy site.

The restraining order against Glick, who lobbies for increased Jewish access to the Mount, was put into effect last September after a Muslim woman filed charges against him for pushing her and breaking her arm at the site. Glick has denied the allegations.

But the District Court on Wednesday sided with police, who claimed there has been no change in the circumstances necessitating Glick’s ban that would allow him to visit the site.

The court raised concern that violence might break out in the holy compound if Glick was to return to it before the allegations against him were resolved.

“The danger and risk of similar events has not yet passed, and thus there is no justification for repealing or canceling the previously determined terms,” Jerusalem District Court Judge Carmi Mosek ruled.

Glick had told the court his medical condition since his shooting lowered the risk that he would create turmoil, and asked for all suspensions against him to be lifted.

According to Glick’s attorney, the latest court decision plays into the hands of Muslim rioters. “It is unfortunate that the court is supporting Muslim rioters at the Temple Mount,” Yitzhak Ram told online news site NRG after the hearing.

“There is a sense that the court is not imposing the Israeli law, which enshrines the freedom of worship, but rather the Jordanian law, which discriminates Jews in every possible aspect.”

He added that Glick would appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Glick was shot four times outside the Menachem Begin Heritage Center in central Jerusalem on the night of October 29, spurring officials to briefly close the the Temple Mount to both Jewish and Muslim visits amid a spike in tensions swirling around the sensitive holy site.

The activist, who narrowly missed winning a Knesset seat with Likud in the March elections, regularly campaigns to open the site, known as Haram al-Sharif to Muslims, for Jewish prayer, which is currently banned under the status quo.

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