Peres to remain sedated, condition still ‘serious but stable’
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Peres to remain sedated, condition still ‘serious but stable’

Former president has ‘quiet night,’ his office says, three days after major stroke; no plans to revise treatment

File: Shimon Peres in Tel Aviv, November 30, 2015 (Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)
File: Shimon Peres in Tel Aviv, November 30, 2015 (Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)

Former Israeli president Shimon Peres’s condition was still “serious and stable” on Friday, with doctors recommending the 93-year-old remain sedated and on a respirator three days after he suffered a major stroke, his office said.

“The ninth president had a quiet night. There is no change in his condition — it continues to be serious, but stable,” a statement from his office said Friday morning. “After consultations with his doctors, it was decided this morning that treatment would continue in accordance with his condition, and therefore he will remain sedated and on a respirator.

Peres’s doctors on Thursday had reported “real improvement” in his condition.

“There is another real improvement today,” Peres’s personal physician and son-in-law Rafi Walden said, describing his condition as serious but stable. He said it was likely his condition would remain that way for the coming days.

The veteran statesman’s daughter on Wednesday said Peres had briefly opened his eyes and squeezed her hand when prompted.

Head of the Sheba Medical Center, Itzhak Krais, and Professor Raphy Walden, son-in -law and personal physician of former Israeli president Shimon Peres, speak with media at the hospital on September 14, 2016. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)
Head of the Sheba Medical Center, Itzhak Krais, left, and Professor Raphi Walden, son-in-law and personal physician of former Israeli president Shimon Peres, speak with media at the hospital on September 14, 2016. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)

After feeling unwell during lunch on Tuesday, Peres was rushed to the hospital in the Tel Aviv suburb of Ramat Gan for medical tests. Initial blood tests revealed a chemical imbalance. After further tests, at around 7 p.m. aides and a nurse attending to him noticed a deterioration in his usually gregarious interaction with those around him.

He said his head hurt, causing the medical team to suspect a stroke. He was given a CT scan at 8 p.m. that confirmed internal bleeding in the brain.

Former Israeli president Shimon Peres at an event marking 40 years since Operation Entebbe, held at Peres Center for Peace in Tel Aviv, June 27, 2016. (Kelmer/Flash90)
Former Israeli president Shimon Peres at an event marking 40 years since Operation Entebbe, held at Peres Center for Peace in Tel Aviv, June 27, 2016. (Kelmer/Flash90)

The “massive intracranial hemorrhage” occurred in the middle of a typically busy day for the nonagenarian, who turned 93 on August 2 but has remained active in public life after a seven-decade career as a politician.

Peres is the elder statesman of Israeli politics, one of the country’s most admired symbols and the last surviving link to its founding fathers.

Over a seven-decade career, he’s held virtually every senior political office, including two stints as prime minister and extended terms as foreign, defense and finance minister. He won the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize for his work in reaching an interim peace agreement with the Palestinians.

Long a divisive personality in Israeli politics, Peres finally became one of Israel’s most popular public figures in his later years.

Earlier this month, Peres underwent surgery to receive an artificial pacemaker after he was diagnosed with an abnormal heart rhythm in July following a series of minor health scares.

The implant was recommended by Peres’s doctors, including personal physician Walden, after he was diagnosed in July with atrial fibrillation.

He suffered a mild heart attack in January and underwent a cardiac angioplasty to open a blocked artery. He had been hospitalized twice after suffering chest pains.

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