Promising to ‘win,’ Trump says US will keep fighting in Afghanistan
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Promising to ‘win,’ Trump says US will keep fighting in Afghanistan

Unveiling new strategy, president says troops will stay in war-torn country to avoid 'predictable and unacceptable' results of a rapid withdrawal

US President Donald Trump speaks at Fort Myer in Arlington Virginia,  August 21, 2017, during a Presidential Address to the Nation about a strategy he believes will best position the US to eventually declare victory in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
US President Donald Trump speaks at Fort Myer in Arlington Virginia, August 21, 2017, during a Presidential Address to the Nation about a strategy he believes will best position the US to eventually declare victory in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Declaring the US will win “in the end,” President Donald Trump vowed Monday night to keep American troops fighting in Afghanistan despite his earlier inclination to withdraw. But he insisted the US would not offer “a blank check” after 16 years of war, and he pointedly declined to say whether or when more troops might be sent.

In a prime-time address billed as the unveiling of his new Afghanistan strategy, Trump said the US would shift away from a “time-based” approach, instead linking its assistance to results and to cooperation from the beleaguered Afghan government, Pakistan and others.

Still, he offered few details about how that approach would differ substantively from what the US has already tried unsuccessfully under the past two presidents.

“We will not talk about numbers of troops or our plans for further military activities,” Trump said. “Conditions on the ground, not arbitrary timetables, will guide our strategy from now on.”

Ahead of his speech, US officials said they expected the president to go along with a Pentagon recommendation to send nearly 4,000 new troops, boosting the total of 8,400 in Afghanistan now. At its peak, the U.S. had roughly 100,000 there, under the Obama administration in 2010-2011.

U. Gen. John Nicholson, top US commander in Afghanistan, left, talks with Col. Khanullah Shuja, commander of the national mission brigade of the Afghan special operations force, and US Gen. Joseph Votel, head of U. Central Command, at Camp Morehead in Afghanistan, Aug. 20, 2017. (Photo/Lolita Baldor)
U. Gen. John Nicholson, top US commander in Afghanistan, left, talks with Col. Khanullah Shuja, commander of the national mission brigade of the Afghan special operations force, and US Gen. Joseph Votel, head of U. Central Command, at Camp Morehead in Afghanistan, Aug. 20, 2017. (Photo/Lolita Baldor)

Trump said his “original instinct was to pull out,” alluding to his long-expressed view before becoming president that Afghanistan was an unsolvable quagmire requiring a fast US withdrawal. Since taking office, Trump said, he’d determined that approach could create a vacuum that terrorists including al-Qaeda and the Islamic State could “instantly fill.”

Trump said the American people are “weary of war without victory.”

“I share the America people’s frustration,” Trump said at the Army’s Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, in Arlington, Virginia, across the Potomac River from the White House. Still, he insisted that “in the end, we will win.”

Trump’s speech concluded a months-long internal debate within his administration over whether to pull back from the Afghanistan conflict, as he and a few advisers were inclined to do, or to embroil the US further in a war that has eluded American solutions for the past 16 years. Several times, officials predicted he was nearing a decision to adopt his commanders’ recommendations, only to see the final judgment delayed.

The Pentagon has argued the US must stay engaged to ensure terrorists can’t again use the territory to threaten America. Afghan military commanders have agreed, making clear they want and expect continued US military help. But elected officials in the US have been mixed, with many advocating against sending more troops.

US forces and Afghan security police are seen in Asad Khil near the site of a US bombing in the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, April 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

US forces and Afghan security police are seen in Asad Khil near the site of a US bombing in the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, April 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

As a candidate, Trump criticized the war and said the US should quickly pull out, but he also campaigned on a vow to start winning wars. Exiting now, with the Taliban resurgent, would be impossible to sell as victory.

“I think there’s a relative certainty that the Afghan government would eventually fall,” said Mark Jacobson, an Army veteran and NATO’s former deputy representative in Kabul.

And while Trump has pledged to put “America First,” keeping US interests above any others, his national security advisers have warned that the Afghan forces are still far too weak to succeed without help. That is especially important as the Taliban advance and a squeezed Islamic State group looks for new havens beyond Syria and Iraq. Even now, Afghan’s government controls just half the country.

As officers advocated for the troop increase, the Pentagon did not claim it would end the conflict. But military officials maintained it could help stabilize the Afghan government and break a stalemate with the Taliban.

The setting for Monday night’s speech, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, sits alongside Arlington National Cemetery, the final resting place for many Americans who have died in the war.

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