Lebanon protesters successfully form 170-kilometer human chain, says organizer
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Lebanon protesters successfully form 170-kilometer human chain, says organizer

Tens of thousands participate, linking north and south of country in demonstration rejecting sectarian affiliation and calling for unity

Lebanese protesters hold hands to form a human chain along the coast from north to south as a symbol of unity, during ongoing anti-government demonstrations in Lebanon's capital Beirut on October 27, 2019. (ANWAR AMRO / AFP)
Lebanese protesters hold hands to form a human chain along the coast from north to south as a symbol of unity, during ongoing anti-government demonstrations in Lebanon's capital Beirut on October 27, 2019. (ANWAR AMRO / AFP)

Tens of thousands of Lebanese successfully formed a 170-kilometer-long (105 miles) human chain Sunday, stretching the length of the country from Tripoli in the north to Tyre in the south, in a show of solidarity with anti-government protests, organizers said.

“I can confirm that the human chain was a success,” Julie Tegho Bou Nassif, one of the organizers, told AFP.

On foot, by bicycle and on motorbikes, demonstrators and volunteers fanned out along the main north-south highway.

The protesters joined hands along a main bridge connecting central Beirut to the north and south in a show of unity while nationwide protests enter their 11th day. Demonstrators have rejected government economic reform proposals, saying they want a government and political system change.

Marcel Karkour, a mother who took part with her two children, said she wants a more “beautiful” Lebanon for the future of her family.

Lebanese protesters hold hands to form a human chain along the coast from north to south as a symbol of unity, during ongoing anti-government demonstrations in the southern Lebanese port city of Sidon on October 27, 2019. (Mahmoud ZAYYAT/AFP)

Speaking as the demonstration was forming up, Bou Nassif said volunteer motorcyclists helped to identify gaps in the chain.

“The idea behind this human chain is to show an image of a Lebanon which, from north to south, rejects any sectarian affiliation,” the 31-year-old history professor told AFP.

“There is no political demand today, we only want to send a message by simply holding hands under the Lebanese flag.”

The rallies have paralyzed a country already grappling with a severe fiscal crisis. But they have united the demonstrators against a political system that dates back to the civil war.

The protests have been remarkable for their territorial reach and the absence of political or sectarian banners, in a country often defined by its divisions. Demonstrators have stayed out in the streets, defying what they said were attempts by Hezbollah to defuse their movement.

Tension has mounted in recent days between security forces and protesters, who are blocking roads and bringing the country to a standstill to press their demands for a complete overhaul of the political system.

Lebanon’s reviled political elite has been defending a belated package of economic reforms and appeared willing to reshuffle the government, but protesters who have stayed in the streets since October 17 want more.

‘National unity’

The leaderless protest movement, driven mostly by a young generation of men and women born after the 1975-1990 civil war, has even been described by some as the birth of a Lebanese citizen identity.

“We want to reinforce this feeling of national unity that has been appearing in Lebanon over the past 10 days,” Bou Nassif said.

The army has sought to reopen main roads across the country, where schools and banks have been closed for more than a week.

In one of the most serious incidents, the army opened fire on Friday to confront a group of protesters blocking a road in Tripoli, wounding at least six people.

But the unprecedented protest movement has been relatively incident-free, despite tensions with the armed forces and attempts by party loyalists to stage counter-demonstrations.

Hezbollah supporters stand in front of Lebanese riot policemen, as they shout slogans praising the terror groups leader Hassan Nassrallah, during a protest near the government palace, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, October 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Protesters have been demanding the removal of the entire ruling class, which has remained largely unchanged in three decades.

Many of the political heavyweights are former warlords seen as representing little beyond their own sectarian or geographical community.

Brink of collapse

The protesters see them as corrupt and incompetent and have so far dismissed measures proposed by the political leadership to quell the protests.

“We’ve had the same people in charge for 30 years,” said Elie, a 40-year-old demonstrator walking in central Beirut on Sunday morning with a Lebanese flag.

Prime Minister Saad Hariri last Monday announced a package of economic reforms which aims to revive an economy that has been on the brink of collapse for months.

His coalition partners have supported the move and warned that a political vacuum in times of economic peril risked chaos.

But the protesters have accused the political elite of desperately attempting to save their jobs and have stuck to their demands for deep, systemic change.

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