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National Campus for the Archaeology of Israel set to be completed by end 2022

Amanda Borschel-Dan is The Times of Israel's Jewish World and Archaeology editor.

The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein National Campus for the Archaeology of Israel (Alex Wiegman, Israel Antiquities Authority)
The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein National Campus for the Archaeology of Israel (Alex Wiegman, Israel Antiquities Authority)

A decades-long building project to house the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) in Jerusalem’s Museum Hill gets a major boost with a $3 million grant from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust.

“The Antiquities Authority thanks the Helmsley Charitable Trust for its significant donation, which gives renewed impetus to the project, and will allow the authority to move to the campus by the end of 2022,” says Eli Eskozido, director of the Antiquities Authority.

Designed in 2002 by architect Moshe Safdie, the 33,445 square meter (360,000 square foot) Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein National Campus for the Archaeology of Israel broke ground in 2010. Most of the construction was completed within a few years, after which the future headquarters of the IAA sat empty despite earlier estimates of completion and habitation by 2014.

Currently, the IAA spreads its Jerusalem offices between the technological park at Har Hotzvim, the Israel Museum, and the East Jerusalem Rockefeller Museum.

The new campus aims to display “millions of excavated artifacts that will be assembled and displayed for the public for the first time,” according to the IAA, as well as house the IAA staff offices and laboratories. The Dead Sea scrolls laboratory will also be open to the public, according to the IAA website.

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