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Reacting to Trump peace plan, France insists on two-state solution

Paris welcomes US efforts, says two-state formula is ‘in conformity with international law and internationally-agreed parameters,’ necessary for ‘a just and lasting peace’

US President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu participate in a joint statement in the East Room of the White House, in Washington, DC, on January 28, 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images/AFP)
US President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu participate in a joint statement in the East Room of the White House, in Washington, DC, on January 28, 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images/AFP)

PARIS, France — France on Wednesday insisted on a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a day after US President Donald Trump unveiled a Middle East peace plan Paris said it would “carefully study.”

“France welcomes President Trump’s efforts and will carefully study the peace plan he presented,” the foreign ministry said in a statement.

“A two-state solution, in conformity with international law and internationally-agreed parameters is necessary for the establishment of a just and lasting peace in the Middle East.”

France will continue working with the United States and Europe “and all those that can contribute to the achievement of this objective,” the statement said.

“It will remain attentive to respecting and taking into account the legitimate aspirations of both Israelis and Palestinians.”

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas gestures as he delivers a speech in the West Bank city of Ramallah, following the announcement by US President Donald Trump of the Mideast peace plan, January 28, 2020. (ABBAS MOMANI/AFP)

Trump on Tuesday promised “a new dawn,” in unveiling, side-by-side with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the plan that was angrily rejected as biased by the Palestinians.

But it does speak of a Palestinian state and a Palestinian capital around Jerusalem.

The plan grants Israel much of what it has sought in decades of international diplomacy, namely control over Jerusalem as its “undivided” capital, rather than a city to share with the Palestinians. The plan also lets Israel annex West Bank settlements.

It would also end hopes for a so-called “right of return.” Millions of Palestinians or their descendants who fled or were forced out when the Jewish state was created in 1948 would no longer have a case to go back.

Criticizing previous US diplomatic efforts as overly vague, Trump said his version was 80 pages long and contained a map depicting the proposed future neighboring states.

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